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An empirical analysis of students’ friendship ties formation

Author

Listed:
  • Krekhovets, Ekaterina

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Nizhny Novgorod, Russian Federation)

  • Poldin, Oleg

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Nizhny Novgorod, Russian Federation)

Abstract

We consider the structure of social network of university students, and analyze factors that lead to the personal communication (friendship) network formation. Using the data from student survey and administrative information, we estimate the econometric models that assume homophily and propinquity effects on the likelihood of being friends. Specifically, we estimate linear and logistic probability models with and without fixed effects. The results confirm the significance of such friendship formation factors as sharing the same study group, living in dormitory, similar academic achievement and having the same gender. The probability of a tie increases with the number of similar attributes

Suggested Citation

  • Krekhovets, Ekaterina & Poldin, Oleg, 2015. "An empirical analysis of students’ friendship ties formation," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 40(4), pages 49-63.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:apltrx:0277
    as

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    File URL: http://pe.cemi.rssi.ru/pe_2015_4_49-63.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David Marmaros & Bruce Sacerdote, 2006. "How Do Friendships Form?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(1), pages 79-119.
    2. Adriaan R Soetevent & Peter Kooreman, 2005. "Social Ties within School Classes: The Roles of Gender, Ethnicity, and Having Older Siblings," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(3), pages 373-391, Autumn.
    3. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588, January.
    4. Víctor Elías & Lucas Ronconi & Julio Elías, 2007. "Discrimination and Social Networks: Popularity among High School Students in Argentina," Research Department Publications 3238, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    5. Mayer, Adalbert & Puller, Steven L., 2008. "The old boy (and girl) network: Social network formation on university campuses," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1-2), pages 329-347, February.
    6. David Dekker & David Krackhardt & Tom Snijders, 2007. "Sensitivity of MRQAP Tests to Collinearity and Autocorrelation Conditions," Psychometrika, Springer;The Psychometric Society, vol. 72(4), pages 563-581, December.
    7. Diliara Valeeva & Oleg Poldin & Maria Yudkevich, 2013. "Friendly Relationships and Relationships of Assistance at a University," Educational Studies, Higher School of Economics, issue 4, pages 70-84.
    8. Víctor Elías & Lucas Ronconi & Julio Elías, 2007. "Discrimination and Social Networks: Popularity among High School Students in Argentina," Research Department Publications 3238, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    social networks; friendship networks; social capital; higher education; binary choice model;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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