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Income inequality in Russian regions: comparative analysis

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  • K.P. Gluschenko (glu@nsu.ru )

Abstract

This article reviews the domestic and foreign studies which empirically analyze inter-regional income inequality in Russia. The studies are grouped according to the statistical approaches applied in these studies (cross-sectional analysis, time series analysis, and distribution dynamics analysis). The adequacy of the techniques used and data analyzed is discussed. We also consider the issue of relationship between studying inter-regional income inequality and policy implications.

Suggested Citation

  • K.P. Gluschenko (glu@nsu.ru ), 2010. "Income inequality in Russian regions: comparative analysis," Journal "Region: Economics and Sociology", Institute of Economics and Industrial Engineering of Siberian Branch of RAS, vol. 4.
  • Handle: RePEc:nos:regioe:2010-4_6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Göran Therborn & K.C. Ho, 2009. "Introduction," City, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 53-62.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Evgeniya Kolomak, 2013. "Spatial inequalities in Russia: dynamic and sectorial analysis," International Journal of Economic Policy in Emerging Economies, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, pages 375-402.
    2. Robert Lehmann & Klaus Wohlrabe, 2015. "Forecasting GDP at the Regional Level with Many Predictors," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 16(2), pages 226-254, May.
    3. Vladimir Hlasny, 2017. "Different Faces of Inequality across Asia: Decomposition of Income Gaps across Demographic Groups," LIS Working papers 691, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Russian regions; inter-regional inequality; income convergence; personal incomes; gross regional product;

    JEL classification:

    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • C20 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - General
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • P25 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Urban, Rural, and Regional Economics
    • R15 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Econometric and Input-Output Models; Other Methods
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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