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Job-Related Training on Russian Enterprises

Author

Listed:
  • Roshchin, S.

    (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia)

  • Travkin, P.

    (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia)

Abstract

An effective system of personnel training is one of the most important factors of companies' growth and development of the whole economy, especially in times of rapid technological progress. This study is aimed to analyze the factors affecting the companies' stimulus to invest in the employees' human capital in Russia. Logistic regressions to determine the effects using data from Russian firms in 2011 are applied in the study. The study shows that innovative activity of the enterprise, a high proportion of workers with higher education, and an active employment policy have a positive effect on the probability of the availability of training programs in the enterprise.

Suggested Citation

  • Roshchin, S. & Travkin, P., 2015. "Job-Related Training on Russian Enterprises," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 150-171.
  • Handle: RePEc:nea:journl:y:2015:i:26:p:150-171
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bassanini, Andrea & Brunello, Giorgio, 2007. "Barriers to Entry, Deregulation and Workplace Training," IZA Discussion Papers 2746, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. David H. Autor, 2001. "Why Do Temporary Help Firms Provide Free General Skills Training?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1409-1448.
    3. Acemoglu, Daron & Pischke, Jorn-Steffen, 1999. "Beyond Becker: Training in Imperfect Labour Markets," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(453), pages 112-142, February.
    4. Lorraine Dearden & Howard Reed & John Van Reenen, 2006. "The Impact of Training on Productivity and Wages: Evidence from British Panel Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(4), pages 397-421, August.
    5. Tan, Hong & Savchenko, Yevgeniya & Gimpelson, Vladimir & Kapelyushnikov, Rostislav & Lukyanova, Anna, 2007. "Skills shortages and training in Russian enterprises," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4222, The World Bank.
    6. Travkin, Pavel, 2014. "The impact of the on-the-job training on Russian worker’s salary: The effect of abilities approach," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 33(1), pages 51-70.
    7. Katz, Eliakim & Ziderman, Adrian, 1990. "Shared investment in general training : the role of information," Policy Research Working Paper Series 535, The World Bank.
    8. Barron, John M & Berger, Mark C & Black, Dan A, 1997. "How Well Do We Measure Training?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(3), pages 507-528, July.
    9. Alison L. Booth & Mark L. Bryan, 2005. "Testing Some Predictions of Human Capital Theory: New Training Evidence from Britain," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(2), pages 391-394, May.
    10. Katz, Eliakim & Ziderman, Adrian, 1990. "Investment in General Training: The Role of Information and Labour Mobility," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(403), pages 1147-1158, December.
    11. Bassanini, Andrea & Booth, Alison L. & Brunello, Giorgio & De Paola, Maria & Leuven, Edwin, 2005. "Workplace Training in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 1640, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. Katja Görlitz & Joel Stiebale, 2011. "The Impact of Product Market Competition on Employers’ Training Investments. Evidence from German Establishment Panel Data," De Economist, Springer, vol. 159(1), pages 1-23, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sergey Roshchin & Sergey Solntsev & Dmitry Vasilyev, 2017. "Recruiting and Job Search Technologies in the Age of Internet," Foresight and STI Governance (Foresight-Russia till No. 3/2015), National Research University Higher School of Economics, vol. 11(4), pages 33-43.
    2. Ilya Korshunov & Olga Gaponova & Nadezda Gaponova, 2019. "Adult training and education in the context of economic development of regions," Economy of region, Centre for Economic Security, Institute of Economics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, vol. 1(1), pages 107-120.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    labour economics; job-related training; investment in human capital;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • M53 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Training

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