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Does Money Matter in Shaping Domestic Business Cycles? An International Investigation

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  • FABIO CANOVA
  • TOBIAS MENZ

Abstract

We study the contribution of money to business cycle fluctuations in the US, the UK, Japan, and the Euro area using a small scale structural monetary business cycle model. Constrained likelihood-based estimates of the parameters are provided and time instabilities analyzed. Real balances are statistically important for output and inflation fluctuations. Their contribution changes over time. Models giving money no role provide a distorted representation of the sources of cyclical fluctuations, of the transmission of shocks and of the events of the last 40 years.
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  • Fabio Canova & Tobias Menz, 2011. "Does Money Matter in Shaping Domestic Business Cycles? An International Investigation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43(4), pages 577-607, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:43:y:2011:i:4:p:577-607
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Vespignani, Joaquin L. & Ratti, Ronald A., 2013. "International monetary transmission to the Euro area: Evidence from the U.S., Japan and China," MPRA Paper 49153, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Barthélemy, Jean & Clerc, Laurent & Marx, Magali, 2011. "A two-pillar DSGE monetary policy model for the euro area," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1303-1316, May.
    3. repec:eee:chieco:v:44:y:2017:i:c:p:166-185 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Seitz, Franz & Baumann, Ursel & Albuquerque, Bruno, 2015. "The information content of money and credit for US activity," Working Paper Series 1803, European Central Bank.
    5. Di Bartolomeo, Giovanni & Tirelli, Patrizio & Acocella, Nicola, 2014. "Trend inflation, the labor market wedge, and the non-vertical Phillips curve," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 1022-1035.
    6. Caraiani, Petre, 2016. "Money and output causality: A structural approach," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 220-236.
    7. Caraiani, Petre, 2015. "Estimating DSGE models across time and frequency," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 33-49.
    8. Petre Caraiani, 2014. "Do money and financial variables help forecasting output in emerging European Economies?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(2), pages 743-763, March.
    9. Araújo, Eurilton, 2015. "Monetary policy objectives and Money’s role in U.S. business cycles," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 85-107.
    10. Franz Seitz & Markus A. Schmidt, 2014. "Money In Modern Macro Models: A Review of the Arguments," Journal of Reviews on Global Economics, Lifescience Global, vol. 3, pages 156-174.
    11. Benczur, Peter & Konya, Istvan, 2013. "Convergence, capital accumulation and the nominal exchange rate," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 260-281.
    12. Giovanni Di Bartolomeo & Patrizio Tirelli & Nicola Acocella, 2013. "Trend inflation as a workers’ discipline device," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 40(2), pages 215-235, May.
    13. Caraiani, Petre, 2012. "Money and output: New evidence based on wavelet coherence," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 116(3), pages 547-550.
    14. Alexander Kriwoluzky & Christian A. Stoltenberg, 2015. "Monetary Policy and the Transaction Role of Money in the US," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 125(587), pages 1452-1473, September.
    15. Cendejas, José Luis & Castañeda, Juan E. & Muñoz, Félix-Fernando, 2014. "Business cycle, interest rate and money in the euro area: A common factor model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 136-141.
    16. Zanetti, Francesco, 2012. "Banking and the role of money in the business cycle," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 87-94.
    17. Caraiani, Petre, 2016. "The role of money in DSGE models: a forecasting perspective," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 47(PB), pages 315-330.
    18. repec:ecb:ecbwps:20141803 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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