IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/mcb/jmoncb/v40y2008i8p1783-1790.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

How Important Is Money in the Conduct of Monetary Policy? A Comment

Author

Listed:
  • BENNETT T. McCALLUM

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • BENNETT T. McCALLUM, 2008. "How Important Is Money in the Conduct of Monetary Policy? A Comment," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 40(8), pages 1783-1790, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:40:y:2008:i:8:p:1783-1790
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1538-4616.2008.00182.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Reynard, Samuel, 2007. "Maintaining low inflation: Money, interest rates, and policy stance," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(5), pages 1441-1471, July.
    2. Freedman, Charles, 2000. "Monetary Policy Implementation: Past, Present and Future--Will Electronic Money Lead to the Eventual Demise of Central Banking?," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(2), pages 211-227, July.
    3. Michael Woodford, 2005. "Firm-Specific Capital and the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 1(2), September.
    4. Nelson, Edward, 2003. "The future of monetary aggregates in monetary policy analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(5), pages 1029-1059, July.
    5. Michael Woodford, 2008. "How Important Is Money in the Conduct of Monetary Policy?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 40(8), pages 1561-1598, December.
    6. Benjamin M. Friedman, 2000. "Decoupling at the Margin: The Threat to Monetary Policy from the Electronic Revolution in Banking," NBER Working Papers 7955, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Friedman, Benjamin M, 2000. "Decoupling at the Margin: The Threat to Monetary Policy from the Electronic Revolution in Banking," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(2), pages 261-272, July.
    8. Woodford, Michael, 2000. "Monetary Policy in a World without Money," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(2), pages 229-260, July.
    9. McCallum, Bennett T., 2003. "Multiple-solution indeterminacies in monetary policy analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(5), pages 1153-1175, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Annicchiarico, Barbara & Giammarioli, Nicola & Piergallini, Alessandro, 2012. "Budgetary policies in a DSGE model with finite horizons," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 111-130.
    2. Nakashima, Kiyotaka & Saito, Makoto, 2012. "On the comparison of alternative specifications for money demand: The case of extremely low interest rate regimes in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 454-471.
    3. Fabio Canova & Tobias Menz, 2009. "Does money matter in shaping domestic business cycles? An international investigation (with appendices)," Economics Working Papers 1242, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Nov 2010.
    4. Balfoussia, Hiona & Brissimis, Sophocles & Delis, Manthos D, 2011. "The theoretical framework of monetary policy revisited," MPRA Paper 32236, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Matteo Fragetta & Giovanni Melina, 2013. "Identification of monetary policy in SVAR models: a data-oriented perspective," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(2), pages 831-844, October.
    6. repec:ksp:journ1:v:4:y:2017:i:1:p:1-13 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Thornton, Daniel L., 2014. "Monetary policy: Why money matters (and interest rates don’t)," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 202-213.
    8. Rubens Penha Cysne & David Turchick, 2010. "Money Supply and Capital Accumulation on the Transition Path Revisited," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 42(6), pages 1173-1184, September.
    9. Jean Louis EKOMANE & Benjamin YAMB, 2016. "The Measurement of Credit Channel in the CEMAC Zone," Journal of Economics and Political Economy, KSP Journals, vol. 3(4), pages 744-766, December.
    10. repec:bla:pacecr:v:22:y:2017:i:3:p:350-382 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Romina Bafile & Alessandro Piergallini, 2017. "Firms’ money demand and monetary policy," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(3), pages 350-382, August.
    12. Bennett T. McCallum, 2009. "Indeterminancy from inflation forecast targeting : problem or pseudo-problem?," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Win, pages 25-51.
    13. repec:eee:jmacro:v:54:y:2017:i:pa:p:110-126 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Schreiber, Sven, 2013. "(When) does money growth help to predict Euro-area inflation at low frequencies?," Discussion Papers 2013/10, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:40:y:2008:i:8:p:1783-1790. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0022-2879 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.