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How Sticky Is Sticky Enough? A Distributional and Impulse Response Analysis of New Keynesian DSGE Models




In this paper, we add to the literature on the assessment of how well data simulated from new-Keynesian dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models reproduce the dynamic features of historical data. In particular, we evaluate sticky price, sticky price with dynamic indexation, and sticky information models using impulse response and correlation measures and via implementation of a distribution based approach for comparing (possibly) misspecified DSGE models using simulated and historical inflation and output gap data. One of our main findings is that for a standard level of stickiness (i.e., annual price or information adjustment), the sticky price model with indexation dominates other models. We also find that when a lower level of information and price stickiness is used (i.e., bi-annual adjustment), there is much less to choose between the models (see Bils and Klenow 2004, for evidence in favor of lower levels of stickiness). This finding is due to the fact that simulated and historical densities are "much" closer under bi-annual adjustment. Copyright 2007 The Ohio State University.

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  • Oleg Korenok & Norman R. Swanson, 2007. "How Sticky Is Sticky Enough? A Distributional and Impulse Response Analysis of New Keynesian DSGE Models," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(6), pages 1481-1508, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:39:y:2007:i:6:p:1481-1508

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Korenok, Oleg, 2008. "Empirical comparison of sticky price and sticky information models," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 906-927, September.
    2. N. Gregory Mankiw & Ricardo Reis, 2002. "Sticky Information versus Sticky Prices: A Proposal to Replace the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1295-1328.
    3. Meyer-Gohde, Alexander, 2010. "Linear rational-expectations models with lagged expectations: A synthetic method," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 984-1002, May.
    4. repec:zbw:rwirep:0255 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Sidney Martins Caetano & Guilherme Valle Moura, 2011. "Reajuste Informacionalno Brasil: uma aplicação da curva de Phillips sobrigidez de informação," Anais do XXXVII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 37th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 54, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    6. Arslan, M. Murat, 2010. "Relative importance of sticky prices and sticky information in price setting," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1124-1135, September.
    7. Bruchez, Pierre-Alain, 2007. "A Hybrid Sticky-Price and Sticky-Information Model," MPRA Paper 3540, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Oleg Korenok & Stanislav Radchenko & Norman R. Swanson, 2010. "International evidence on the efficacy of new-Keynesian models of inflation persistence," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(1), pages 31-54.
    9. Norman Swanson & Oleg Korenok, 2006. "The Incremental Predictive Information Associated with Using Theoretical New Keynesian DSGE Models Versus Simple Linear Alternatives," Departmental Working Papers 200615, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    10. repec:cuf:journl:y:2017:v:18:i:1:jensen is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Mankiw, N. Gregory & Reis, Ricardo, 2010. "Imperfect Information and Aggregate Supply," Handbook of Monetary Economics,in: Benjamin M. Friedman & Michael Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 5, pages 183-229 Elsevier.
    12. repec:spr:portec:v:16:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10258-017-0129-x is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Carrillo, Julio A., 2012. "How well does sticky information explain the dynamics of inflation, output, and real wages?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 830-850.
    14. Orlando Gomes, 2012. "Transitional Dynamics in Sticky-Information General Equilibrium Models," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 39(4), pages 387-407, April.
    15. Bredemeier, Christian & Goecke, Henry, 2011. "Sticky Prices vs. Sticky Information – A Cross-Country Study of Inflation Dynamics," Ruhr Economic Papers 255, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    16. Christian Bredemeier & Henry Goecke, 2011. "Sticky Prices vs. Sticky Information – A Cross-Country Study of Inflation Dynamics," Ruhr Economic Papers 0255, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    17. White, Halbert, 2006. "Time-series estimation of the effects of natural experiments," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 135(1-2), pages 527-566.
    18. Trabandt, Mathias, 2003. "Sticky Information vs. Sticky Prices : A Horse Race in a DSGE Framework," SFB 373 Discussion Papers 2003,41, Humboldt University of Berlin, Interdisciplinary Research Project 373: Quantification and Simulation of Economic Processes.

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