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Labour Protection and Productivity in EU Economies: 1995-2005

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  • Mirella Damiani
  • Fabrizio Pompei

Abstract

The present study examines cross-national and sectoral differences in multifactor productivity growth in sixteen European countries from 1995 to 2005. The main aim is to ascertain the role of flexible employment contracts and collective labour relationships in explaining the ample differentials recorded in the European economy. We use the EU KLEMS database for growth accounting and a broad set of indicators of labour regulations, covering two distinct 'areas' of labour regulation: employment laws and collective relations laws. This comprehensive approach allows us to consider arrangements that regulate allocation of labour inputs (fixed-term and part-time contracts, hours worked) and the payoff and decision rights of employees. We find that, since 1995, European countries have not followed similar patterns of growth. A large number of variations between European economies are caused by marked differentials in multifactor productivity and part of this heterogeneity is caused by sectoral diversities. We show that, in labour-intensive sectors such as services, fixed-term contracts, which imply shorter-term jobs and lower employment tenures, may discourage investment in skills and have detrimental effects on multifactor productivity increases. Employment protection reforms which slacken the rules of fixed-term contracts cause potential drawbacks in terms of low productivity gains. We also find that more stringent regulation of these practices, as well as a climate of collective relations, sustain long-term relationships and mitigate these negative effects

Suggested Citation

  • Mirella Damiani & Fabrizio Pompei, 2010. "Labour Protection and Productivity in EU Economies: 1995-2005," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 7(2), pages 373-411, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:liu:liucej:v:7:y:2010:i:2:p:373-411
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    File URL: http://eaces.liuc.it/18242979201002/182429792010070207.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dew-Becker, Ian & Gordon, Robert J, 2008. "The Role of Labour Market Changes in the Slowdown of European Productivity Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 6722, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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    Cited by:

    1. Addessi, William & Saltari, Enrico & Tilli, Riccardo, 2014. "R&D, innovation activity, and the use of external numerical flexibility," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 612-621.
    2. Sebastian NIELEN & Alexander SCHIERSCH, 2016. "Productivity in German manufacturing firms: Does fixed-term employment matter?," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 155(4), pages 535-561, December.
    3. Romina Giuliano & Stephan Kampelmann & Benoît Mahy & François Rycx, 2017. "Short Notice, Big Difference? The Effect of Temporary Employment on Firm Competitiveness across Sectors," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 55(2), pages 421-449, June.
    4. William Addessi & Enrico Saltari & Riccardo Tilli, 2011. "R&D and Innovation Activities and the Use of External Numerical Flexibility," Working Papers 150, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.
    5. Mirella Damiani & Jens Hölscher & Fabrizio Pompei, 2011. "Labour market inequalities and the role of institutions," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 8(2), pages 163-173, December.
    6. repec:iab:iabjlr:v:2017:i:1:p:91-112 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. repec:spr:jlabrs:v:50:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s12651-017-0222-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Vittorio Valli, 2014. "Growth and crises in the Italian economy," Chapters,in: The Great Recession and the Contradictions of Contemporary Capitalism, chapter 10, pages 165-188 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Addessi, William, 2014. "The productivity effect of permanent and temporary labor contracts in the Italian manufacturing sector," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 666-672.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    productivity; labour regulation; comparative institutions;

    JEL classification:

    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • J50 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - General

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