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Differences in motivations and academic achievement

Author

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  • Luis Gamboa
  • Mauricio Rodríguez
  • Andrés García

Abstract

This paper provides new evidence on the effect of pupils’ self-motivation on academic achievement in science across countries. By using the OECD´s Programme for International Student Assessment 2006 (PISA 2006) test, we find that self-motivation has a positive effect on students’ performance. Instrumental Variables Quantile Regression is used to analyze the existence of different estimated coefficients over the scores distribution, allowing us to deal with the potential endogeneity of self-motivation. We find that the impact of intrinsic motivation on academic performance depends on the pupil’s score. Our findings support the importance of designing focalized programs for different populations that foster their motivation towards learning.

Suggested Citation

  • Luis Gamboa & Mauricio Rodríguez & Andrés García, 2013. "Differences in motivations and academic achievement," Lecturas de Economía, Universidad de Antioquia, Departamento de Economía, issue 78, pages 9-44.
  • Handle: RePEc:lde:journl:y:2013:i:78:p:9-44
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    File URL: http://aprendeenlinea.udea.edu.co/revistas/index.php/lecturasdeeconomia/article/view/14330/13667
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. José M. Cordero & Víctor Cristóbal & Daniel Santín, 2018. "Causal Inference On Education Policies: A Survey Of Empirical Studies Using Pisa, Timss And Pirls," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(3), pages 878-915, July.
    2. World Bank Group, 2016. "Education Sector Public Expenditure Tracking and Service Delivery Survey in Zambia," World Bank Other Operational Studies 23884, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    intrinsic motivations; education; ICTs; science;

    JEL classification:

    • C36 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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