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Learning Opportunities and Learning Behaviours of Small Business Starters: Relations with Goal Achievement, Skill Development and Satisfaction

Author

Listed:
  • Marco Gelderen

    ()

  • Lidewey Sluis

    ()

  • Paul Jansen

    ()

Abstract

Learning is a vital issue for small business starters, contributing to short- and long-term business performance, as well as to personal development. This study investigates when and how small business starters learn. It specifies the situations that offer learning opportunities, as well as the learning behaviours that small business starters can employ in order to learn from these opportunities. In a cross-sectional, quantitative study of recently started small business founders, learning opportunities and learning behaviours are related to three outcome measures: a performance outcome (goal achievement), a personal growth outcome (skill development), and an affective evaluation outcome (satisfaction). The results show the importance of learning opportunities and learning behaviours in influencing these outcome variables, albeit not always in the directions we hypothesized. Copyright Springer 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Marco Gelderen & Lidewey Sluis & Paul Jansen, 2005. "Learning Opportunities and Learning Behaviours of Small Business Starters: Relations with Goal Achievement, Skill Development and Satisfaction," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 97-108, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:sbusec:v:25:y:2005:i:1:p:97-108
    DOI: 10.1007/s11187-005-4260-1
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11187-005-4260-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nicholson,Nigel & West,Michael, 1988. "Managerial Job Change," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521357449.
    2. Unknown, 2001. "Book Review," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 176-177, January.
    3. Westhead, Paul & Wright, Mike, 1998. "Novice, portfolio, and serial founders: are they different?," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 173-204, May.
    4. Unknown, 2001. "Book Review," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 175-176, January.
    5. Unknown, 2001. "Book Review," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 351-352, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Rocha, Vera & Carneiro, Anabela & Amorim Varum, Celeste, 2015. "Serial entrepreneurship, learning by doing and self-selection," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 91-106.
    2. Mattias Brachert & Walter Hyll, 2014. "On the Stability of Preferences: Repercussions of Entrepreneurship on Risk Attitudes," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 667, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    3. Saras Sarasvathy & Anil Menon & Graciela Kuechle, 2013. "Failing firms and successful entrepreneurs: serial entrepreneurship as a temporal portfolio," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 417-434, February.
    4. repec:eaa:eerese:v:17:y2017:i:2_2 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    entrepreneurship; learning; learning opportunities; learning behaviours; performance; small business start-ups; M13;

    JEL classification:

    • M13 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - New Firms; Startups

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