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Hedonic approaches based on spatial econometrics and spatial statistics: application to evaluation of project benefits

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  • Morito Tsutsumi

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  • Hajime Seya

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Suggested Citation

  • Morito Tsutsumi & Hajime Seya, 2009. "Hedonic approaches based on spatial econometrics and spatial statistics: application to evaluation of project benefits," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 357-380, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jgeosy:v:11:y:2009:i:4:p:357-380
    DOI: 10.1007/s10109-009-0099-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James Lesage & Manfred Fischer, 2008. "Spatial Growth Regressions: Model Specification, Estimation and Interpretation," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 275-304.
    2. Luc Anselin & Julie Le Gallo, 2006. "Interpolation of Air Quality Measures in Hedonic House Price Models: Spatial Aspects This paper is part of a joint research effort with James Murdoch (University of Texas, Dallas) and Mark Thayer (San," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 31-52.
    3. Won Kim, Chong & Phipps, Tim T. & Anselin, Luc, 2003. "Measuring the benefits of air quality improvement: a spatial hedonic approach," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 24-39, January.
    4. Helen R. Neill & David M. Hassenzahl & Djeto D. Assane, 2007. "Estimating the Effect of Air Quality: Spatial versus Traditional Hedonic Price Models," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 73(4), pages 1088-1111, April.
    5. James Valente & ShanShan Wu & Alan Gelfand & C.F. Sirmans, 2005. "Apartment Rent Prediction Using Spatial Modeling," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 27(1), pages 105-136.
    6. A. F. Militino & M. D. Ugarte & L. García-Reinaldos, 2004. "Alternative Models for Describing Spatial Dependence among Dwelling Selling Prices," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 193-209, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Seya, Hajime & Tsutsumi, Morito & Yamagata, Yoshiki, 2012. "Income convergence in Japan: A Bayesian spatial Durbin model approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 60-71.
    2. Julia Koschinsky & Nancy Lozano-Gracia & Gianfranco Piras, 2012. "The welfare benefit of a home’s location: an empirical comparison of spatial and non-spatial model estimates," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 319-356, July.
    3. Linda Gerkman, 2012. "Empirical spatial econometric modelling of small scale neighbourhood," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 283-298, July.
    4. Eilers, Lea, 2016. "Spatial Dependence in Apartment Offering Prices in Hamburg," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145639, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    5. Seya, Hajime & Yamagata, Yoshiki & Tsutsumi, Morito, 2013. "Automatic selection of a spatial weight matrix in spatial econometrics: Application to a spatial hedonic approach," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 429-444.
    6. Seya, Hajime & Yamagata, Yoshiki & Nakamichi, Kumiko, 2016. "Creation of municipality level intensity data of electricity in Japan," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 162(C), pages 1336-1344.
    7. Hayato Nakanishi, 2017. "Quasi-experimental evidence for the importance of accounting for fear when evaluating catastrophic events," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(2), pages 869-894, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Benefits evaluation; Spatial hedonic approach; Spatial error model; Spatial process model; Anisotropy; C21; R19;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • R19 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Other

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