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Decoupling values of agricultural externalities according to scale: a spatial hedonic approach in brittany

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  • Abdel Fawaz Osseni

    () (SMART - Structures et Marché Agricoles, Ressources et Territoires - AGROCAMPUS OUEST - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique)

  • François Bareille

    () (SMART - Structures et Marché Agricoles, Ressources et Territoires - AGROCAMPUS OUEST - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, DISTAL - Università di Bologna)

  • Pierre Dupraz

    () (SMART - Structures et Marché Agricoles, Ressources et Territoires - AGROCAMPUS OUEST - Institut Agro - Institut national d'enseignement supérieur pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique)

Abstract

Agricultural activities jointly generate various externalities. Hedonic pricing method allows for their valuation. Previous hedonic studies have estimated the value of the externalities generated by a given agricultural activity in a single parameter. Based on simple theoretical model, we illustrate that this parameter captures the sum of the different externalities generated by the activity. Using insights from papers highlighting a distance-decay in the willingness-to-pay, explain that this parameter can differ at different spatial scales. Using specific spatial econometric model with spatial lags on the explanatory variables, we distinguish between the value of infra-municipal agricultural externalities (called direct effects) and the value of extra-municipal agricultural externalities with larger spatial range (called spillover effects) arising from the same agricultural source. Among the estimated models, the spatial lag of the exogenous variable and the general nested spatial models are selected as the best models. We find that swine activities present negative effects at all scales whereas dairy cattle activities, including grassland management, present negative direct effects but positive local spillovers.

Suggested Citation

  • Abdel Fawaz Osseni & François Bareille & Pierre Dupraz, 2019. "Decoupling values of agricultural externalities according to scale: a spatial hedonic approach in brittany," Post-Print hal-02444445, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-02444445
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02444445
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    externalities; nitrogen; agriculture; spatial econometrics;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods

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