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What Helps Working Informal Caregivers? The Role of Workplace Characteristics in Balancing Work and Adult-Care Responsibilities

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  • Martin Zuba

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  • Ulrike Schneider

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Abstract

Population ageing and expected labour shortages mean that successful reconciliation of adult care and paid work is becoming a key issue for employers, employees and frail older people alike. Based on the detailed workplace-related variables in the fourth European Working Condition Survey, we examined differences in levels and determinants of carers’ and non-carers’ role conflict and one of its outcomes, absenteeism. We found caregivers to exhibit higher levels of perceived work–family conflict. Work schedules and time regimes affect carers’ and non-carers’ work–family conflict alike. However, good friends at work and work overload have a larger impact on carers’ work–family conflict. Furthermore, we found indications for a trade-off between perceived work-to-family conflict and absenteeism via workplace policies. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Zuba & Ulrike Schneider, 2013. "What Helps Working Informal Caregivers? The Role of Workplace Characteristics in Balancing Work and Adult-Care Responsibilities," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(4), pages 460-469, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:34:y:2013:i:4:p:460-469
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-012-9347-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jooyeoun Suh, 2016. "Measuring the “Sandwich”: Care for Children and Adults in the American Time Use Survey 2003–2012," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 197-211, June.
    2. Paul Glavin & Amanda Peters, 2015. "The Costs of Caring: Caregiver Strain and Work-Family Conflict Among Canadian Workers," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 5-20, March.
    3. Vedrana Čikeš & Helga Maškarin Ribarić & Kristina Črnjar, 2018. "The Determinants and Outcomes of Absence Behavior: A Systematic Literature Review," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(8), pages 1-26, July.
    4. Hanne Preter & Dorien Looy & Dimitri Mortelmans, 2015. "Retirement Timing of Dual-Earner Couples in 11 European Countries? A Comparison of Cox and Shared Frailty Models," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 396-407, September.

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