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Are Workers with A Long Commute Less Productive? An Empirical Analysis of Absenteeism

Author

Listed:
  • Jos van Ommeren

    (VU University Amsterdam)

  • Eva Gutierrez-i-Puigarnau

    (VU University Amsterdam)

Abstract

We hypothesize, and test for, a negative effect of the length of the commute on worker’s productivity, by examining whether the commute has a positive effect on worker’s absenteeism. Our estimates for Germany indicate that commuting distance induces absenteeism with an elasticity of about 0.07. On average, absenteeism would be about 16 percent less if all workers would have a negligible commute. These results are consistent with urban efficiency wage models. This discussion paper has resulted in a publication in 'Regional Science and Urban Economics' , 41(1) 1-8.

Suggested Citation

  • Jos van Ommeren & Eva Gutierrez-i-Puigarnau, 2009. "Are Workers with A Long Commute Less Productive? An Empirical Analysis of Absenteeism," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-014/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20090014
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Zenou,Yves, 2009. "Urban Labor Economics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521875387.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    absenteeism; commuting; productivity;

    JEL classification:

    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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