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A model based approach for predicting annual poverty rates without expenditure data

Author

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  • Astrid Mathiassen

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Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Astrid Mathiassen, 2009. "A model based approach for predicting annual poverty rates without expenditure data," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 7(2), pages 117-135, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jecinq:v:7:y:2009:i:2:p:117-135
    DOI: 10.1007/s10888-007-9059-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chris Elbers & Jean O. Lanjouw & Peter Lanjouw, 2003. "Micro--Level Estimation of Poverty and Inequality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(1), pages 355-364, January.
    2. Tarozzi, Alessandro, 2007. "Calculating Comparable Statistics From Incomparable Surveys, With an Application to Poverty in India," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 25, pages 314-336, July.
    3. Ravallion, M., 1992. "Poverty Comparisons - A Guide to Concepts and Methods," Papers 88, World Bank - Living Standards Measurement.
    4. Nicholas Minot, 2008. "Are Poor, Remote Areas Left behind in Agricultural Development: The Case of Tanzania," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 17(2), pages 239-276, March.
    5. Ravallion, M., 1998. "Poverty Lines in Theory and Practice," Papers 133, World Bank - Living Standards Measurement.
    6. Hentschel, Jesko, et al, 2000. "Combining Census and Survey Data to Trace the Spatial Dimensions of Poverty: A Case Study of Ecuador," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(1), pages 147-165, January.
    7. Fofack, Hippolyte, 2000. "Combining Light Monitoring Surveys with Integrated Surveys to Improve Targeting for Poverty Reduction: The Case of Ghana," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(1), pages 195-219, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. World Bank, 2016. "Tunisia Poverty Assessment 2015," World Bank Other Operational Studies 24410, The World Bank.
    2. repec:oup:oxecpp:v:69:y:2017:i:4:p:939-962. is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Luc Christiaensen & Peter Lanjouw & Jill Luoto & David Stifel, 2012. "Small area estimation-based prediction methods to track poverty: validation and applications," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 10(2), pages 267-297, June.
    4. repec:jid:journl:y:2018:v:25:i:1:p:1-30 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Dang, Hai-Anh H. & Lanjouw, Peter F. & Serajuddin, Umar, 2014. "Updating poverty estimates at frequent intervals in the absence of consumption data : methods and illustration with reference to a middle-income country," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7043, The World Bank.
    6. Ragui Assaad & Caroline Krafft & Hanan Nazier & Racha Ramadan & Atiyeh Vahidmanesh & Sami Zouari, 2017. "Estimating Poverty and Inequality in the Absence of Consumption Data: An Application to the Middle East and North Africa," Working Papers 1100, Economic Research Forum, revised 05 2017.
    7. repec:asi:joasrj:2017:p:450-458 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Stochastic model; Poverty measurement; Money metric poverty; Survey methods; C31; C42; C81; D12; D31; I32;

    JEL classification:

    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • C42 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Survey Methods
    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty

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