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Are Poor, Remote Areas Left behind in Agricultural Development: The Case of Tanzania

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  • Nicholas Minot

Abstract

The conventional wisdom in Africa is that economic reforms may have stimulated economic growth, but the benefits of this growth have been uneven, favoring urban households and farmers with good market access. This idea, although quite plausible, has rarely been tested empirically. In this paper, we develop a new approach to measuring trends in poverty and inequality and apply it to Tanzania in order to explore the relationship between rural poverty and market access. We find that, between 1991/92 and 2003, poverty fell the least in Dar es Salaam and the most in rural areas. Rural poverty is related to remoteness, but the relationship is surprisingly weak and it varies depending on the definition used. We find little evidence that remote rural areas are being "left behind", either in relative or in absolute terms. Copyright 2008 The author 2007. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Centre for the Study of African Economies. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org, Oxford University Press.

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  • Nicholas Minot, 2008. "Are Poor, Remote Areas Left behind in Agricultural Development: The Case of Tanzania," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 17(2), pages 239-276, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:17:y:2008:i:2:p:239-276
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/jae/ejm018
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    Cited by:

    1. Astrid Mathiassen, 2009. "A model based approach for predicting annual poverty rates without expenditure data," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 7(2), pages 117-135, June.
    2. Minten, Bart & Reardon, Thomas & Vandeplas, Anneleen, 2009. "Linking urban consumers and rural farmers in India: A comparison of traditional and modern food supply chains," IFPRI discussion papers 883, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Sebastian Levine & Benjamin Roberts, 2013. "Robust Estimates of Changes in Poverty and Inequality in Post-Independence Namibia," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 81(2), pages 167-191, June.
    4. Yamano, Takashi & Kijima, Yoko, 2010. "The associations of soil fertility and market access with household income: Evidence from rural Uganda," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 51-59, February.
    5. Barbier, Edward B., 2012. "Natural capital, ecological scarcity and rural poverty," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6232, The World Bank.

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