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The Rentier Predatory State Hypothesis: An Empirical Explanation Of The Resource Curse

  • KHALID R. ALKHATER

    ()

    (Qatar Central Bank and Georgetown University, Qatar)

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    This paper introduces an empirical growth model that explains the perplexing observed growth resource regime dubbed the resource curse. The main hypothesis advanced in this paper, the rentier predatory state hypothesis, holds that under autocracy, the interaction between political power and resource abundance is expected to lead to poor economic outcomes in the long run. In the empirical model, resource abundance is allowed to interact with political repression to generate a negative impact on economic growth. Depending on the extent of the repression, a state dependent on natural resources (a rentier state) can also become a predatory state, i.e., a rentier predatory state, or, in other words, a rentier state with a high rate of political repression. The resulting net effect of resource abundance on economic growth is contingent on the extent of the repression, and a resource-abundant state with a sufficiently high rate of political repression will have negative economic growth, while a state with a low to moderate rate of political repression will have positive economic growth.

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    Article provided by Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics in its journal Journal Of Economic Development.

    Volume (Year): 37 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 4 (December)
    Pages: 29-60

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    Handle: RePEc:jed:journl:v:37:y:2012:i:4:p:29-60
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    1. Rabah Arezki & Frederik van der Ploeg, 2007. "Can the Natural Resource Curse Be Turned Into a Blessing? T+L3479he Role of Trade Policies and Institutions," IMF Working Papers 07/55, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Gernot Doppelhofer & Ronald I. Miller & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 2000. "Determinants of Long-Term Growth: A Bayesian Averaging of Classical Estimates (Bace) Approach," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 266, OECD Publishing.
    3. Heinz Welsch, 2008. "Resource Dependence, Knowledge Creation, And Growth: Revisiting The Natural Resource Curse," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 33(1), pages 45-70, June.
    4. Sergio T. Rebelo, 1990. "Long Run Policy Analysis and Long Run Growth," NBER Working Papers 3325, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Xavier Sala-i-Martin & Arvind Subramanian, 2013. "Addressing the Natural Resource Curse: An Illustration from Nigeria," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 22(4), pages 570-615, August.
    6. Robert J. Barro, 1989. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," NBER Working Papers 3120, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Garfinkel, Michelle R. & Skaperdas, Stergios, 2007. "Economics of Conflict: An Overview," Handbook of Defense Economics, Elsevier.
    8. Hodler, Roland, 2006. "The curse of natural resources in fractionalized countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(6), pages 1367-1386, August.
    9. Stijns, Jean-Philippe C., 2001. "Natural Resource Abundance And Economic Growth Revisited," Berkeley Economics Dissertations-in-Progress Series 25127, University of California, Berkeley, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    10. Brunnschweiler, Christa N., 2008. "Cursing the Blessings? Natural Resource Abundance, Institutions, and Economic Growth," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 399-419, March.
    11. Arezki, Rabah & van der Ploeg, Frederick, 2007. "Can the Natural Resource Curse Be Turned Into a Blessing? The Role of Trade Policies and Institutions," CEPR Discussion Papers 6225, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
    13. Asfaha, Samuel, 2007. "National Revenue Funds: Their Efficacy for Fiscal Stability and Intergenerational Equity," MPRA Paper 7656, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Caballe, Jordi & Santos, Manuel S, 1993. "On Endogenous Growth with Physical and Human Capital," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(6), pages 1042-67, December.
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