IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ijc/ijcjou/y2015q3a3.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Road to Financial Stability: Capital Regulation, Liquidity Regulation, and Resolution

Author

Listed:
  • Stephen G. Cecchetti

    (Brandeis International Business School, NBER, and CEPR)

Abstract

Prior to the 2007–9 financial crisis, regulations addressing risk taking in the financial system were woefully inadequate. In this essay, I summarize the regulatory changes implemented over the past five years and come to three conclusions. First, as a result of the new Basel III standards, the global financial system is now substantially safer than it was, but probably not yet safe enough. Second, the costs of increasing capital requirements have been much smaller than we originally thought. And third, we are best advised to shy away from time-varying discretionary regulatory policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen G. Cecchetti, 2015. "The Road to Financial Stability: Capital Regulation, Liquidity Regulation, and Resolution," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 11(3), pages 127-139, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ijc:ijcjou:y:2015:q:3:a:3
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.ijcb.org/journal/ijcb15q3a3.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.ijcb.org/journal/ijcb15q3a3.htm
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Anat Admati & Martin Hellwig, 2013. "The Bankers' New Clothes: What's Wrong with Banking and What to Do about It," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 9929.
    2. Stephen G. Cecchetti & Marion Kohler, 2014. "When Capital Adequacy and Interest Rate Policy Are Substitutes (And When They Are Not)," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 10(3), pages 205-231, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. How risky are the big U.S. banks?
      by Steve Cecchetti and Kim Schoenholtz in Money, Banking and Financial Markets on 2016-10-03 17:58:45

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Arnould, Guillaume & Dehmej, Salim, 2016. "Is the European banking system robust? An evaluation through the lens of the ECB׳s Comprehensive Assessment," International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 126-144.
    2. Yassine Bakkar & Olivier de Jonghe & Amine Tarazi, 2017. "Does banks' systemic importance affect their capital structure and balance sheet adjustment processes?," Working Papers hal-01636253, HAL.
    3. Amin Jan & Maran Marimuthu, 2016. "Bankruptcy Profile of Foreign versus Domestic Islamic Banks of Malaysia: A Post Crisis Period Analysis," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(1), pages 332-346.
    4. Palek, Jakob & Schwanebeck, Benjamin, 2019. "Optimal monetary and macroprudential policy in a currency union," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 167-186.
    5. Yassine Bakkar & Olivier de Jonghe & Amine Tarazi, 2017. "Does banks' systemic importance affect their capital structure adjustment process?," Working Papers hal-01546995, HAL.
    6. Amin Jan & Maran Marimuthu & Muhammad Kashif Shad & Haseeb ur-Rehman & Muhammad Zahid & Ahmad Ali Jan, 2019. "Bankruptcy profile of the Islamic and conventional banks in Malaysia: a post-crisis period analysis," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 52(1), pages 67-87, February.
    7. Aikman, David & Haldane, Andrew & Hinterschweiger, Marc & Kapadia, Sujit, 2018. "Rethinking financial stability," Bank of England working papers 712, Bank of England.
    8. Hazar Altinbas & Goktug Cenk Akkaya, 2017. "Improving the performance of statistical learning methods with a combined meta-heuristic for consumer credit risk assessment," Risk Management, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 19(4), pages 255-280, November.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Cecchetti, Stephen G., 2016. "On the separation of monetary and prudential policy: How much of the precrisis consensus remains?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 157-169.
    2. Eger, Thomas & Weise, Peter, 2020. "Die Target-Salden in der Eurozone: "Falle" oder Scheinproblem?," Discussion Papers 1/20, Europa-Kolleg Hamburg, Institute for European Integration.
    3. Russell Cooper & Kalin Nikolov, 2018. "Government Debt And Banking Fragility: The Spreading Of Strategic Uncertainty," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 59(4), pages 1905-1925, November.
    4. Darracq Pariès, Matthieu & Kok, Christoffer & Rancoita, Elena, 2019. "Macroprudential policy in a monetary union with cross-border banking," Working Paper Series 2260, European Central Bank.
    5. Kimball, Miles, 2017. "Next generation monetary policy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 54(PA), pages 100-109.
    6. Alexandra Born & Zeno Enders, 2018. "Global Banking, Trade, and the International Transmission of the Great Recession," CESifo Working Paper Series 6912, CESifo.
    7. Raphael Auer, 2019. "Embedded supervision: how to build regulation into blockchain finance," BIS Working Papers 811, Bank for International Settlements.
    8. Fidrmuc, Jarko & Lind, Ronja, 2020. "Macroeconomic impact of Basel III: Evidence from a meta-analysis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 112(C).
    9. Oana Toader, 2015. "Estimating the impact of higher capital requirements on the cost of equity: an empirical study of European banks," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 411-436, September.
    10. Fabrice Collard & Harris Dellas & Behzad Diba & Olivier Loisel, 2017. "Optimal Monetary and Prudential Policies," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 40-87, January.
    11. Thorvaldur Gylfason & Gylfi Zoega, 2017. "The Dutch Disease in Reverse: Iceland's Natural Experiment," CESifo Working Paper Series 6513, CESifo.
    12. Nippel, Peter, 2016. "Investitionsrechnerische Bewertung von ausfallgefährdeten Krediten," Manuskripte aus den Instituten für Betriebswirtschaftslehre der Universität Kiel 664, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Institut für Betriebswirtschaftslehre.
    13. Andrew G. Atkeson & Adrien d’Avernas & Andrea L. Eisfeldt & Pierre-Olivier Weill, 2019. "Government Guarantees and the Valuation of American Banks," NBER Macroeconomics Annual, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(1), pages 81-145.
    14. Marco Pagano, 2014. "Dealing with Financial Crises: How Much Help from Research?," CSEF Working Papers 361, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    15. Mariathasan, Mike & Merrouche, Ouarda, 2014. "The manipulation of basel risk-weights," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 300-321.
    16. Ambrocio, Gene & Hasan, Iftekhar & Jokivuolle, Esa & Ristolainen, Kim, 2020. "Are bank capital requirements optimally set? Evidence from researchers’ views," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 50(C).
    17. Christopher Gandrud & Mark Hallerberg, 2015. "Does Banking Union Worsen the EU's Democratic Deficit? The Need for Greater Supervisory Data Transparency," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(4), pages 769-785, July.
    18. Jackson, Tim & Victor, Peter A., 2015. "Does credit create a ‘growth imperative’? A quasi-stationary economy with interest-bearing debt," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 32-48.
    19. Juliane M. Begenau, 2015. "Capital Requirements, Risk Choice, and Liquidity Provision in a Business Cycle Model," Harvard Business School Working Papers 15-072, Harvard Business School, revised Sep 2016.
    20. Soyoung Kim & Aaron Mehrotra, "undated". "Effects of monetary and macroprudential policies – evidence from inflation targeting economies in the Asia-Pacific region and potential implications for China," GRU Working Paper Series GRU_2016_025, City University of Hong Kong, Department of Economics and Finance, Global Research Unit.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ijc:ijcjou:y:2015:q:3:a:3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Bank for International Settlements). General contact details of provider: https://www.ijcb.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.