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Policy Mandates and Institutional Architecture

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Listed:
  • Ioannis Lazopoulos

    (University of Surrey)

  • Vasco J. Gabriel

    (University of Surrey and NIPE-UM)

Abstract

The model developed in this paper examines the interaction between monetary and macroprudential policies in promoting macroeconomic stability, highlighting the role of shocks and policy instruments. The paper shows that assigning the mandates of monetary and financial stability to independent authorities enhances macroeconomic stability only when some level of coordination exists between policymakers and it is the dominant institutional arrangement when monetary stability is socially important. Instead, when society values financial stability, internalising the policy spillovers by assigning the two mandates to a single policymaker could become the dominant configuration depending on the model's parameter values.

Suggested Citation

  • Ioannis Lazopoulos & Vasco J. Gabriel, 2019. "Policy Mandates and Institutional Architecture," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0419, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  • Handle: RePEc:sur:surrec:0419
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    File URL: https://repec.som.surrey.ac.uk/2019/DP04-19.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination

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