IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

An extra time duration model with application to unemployment duration under benefits in Spain

  • José Mª Arranz

    ()

    (Universidad de Alcalá)

  • Juan Muro

    ()

    (Universidad de Alcalá)

This paper postulates that the effect of unemployment benefits on the hazard rates changes considerably using a traditional duration model that uses only unemployment insurance (UI) data, or deals with unemployment assistance (UA) as a mere extension of UI, instead of an extra time duration model that accounts separately for transition rates to work of the unemployed who receive UI and UA. For UI recipients the hazard rate rises dramatically when UI benefits lapse approaches. On the contrary, for UA recipients the hazard rate remains flat or even has a slight fall nearby the UA lapse. Finally, there is a group of unemployed qualified for UA that quit UI due to the income fall that they will experience when they pass from UI to UA.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.ief.es/documentos/recursos/publicaciones/revistas/hac_pub/171_ExtraTime.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by IEF in its journal Hacienda Pública Española/Revista de Economía Pública.

Volume (Year): 171 (2004)
Issue (Month): 4 (december)
Pages: 133-156

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:hpe:journl:y:2004:v:171:i:4:p:133-156
Contact details of provider: Postal: Avda. Cardenal Herrera Oria, 378, 28035 Madrid
Phone: 91-339.89.15
Fax: 91-339.89.64
Web page: http://www.ief.es
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Olympia Bover & Manuel Arellano & Samuel Bentolila, 2002. "Unemployment Duration, Benefit Duration and the Business Cycle," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(479), pages 223-265, April.
  2. Cullen, Julie Berry & Gruber, Jonathan, 2000. "Does Unemployment Insurance Crowd Out Spousal Labor Supply?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(3), pages 546-72, July.
  3. Heckman, James J. & Singer, Burton, 1984. "Econometric duration analysis," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1-2), pages 63-132.
  4. Frederick J. Tannery, 1983. "Search Effort and Unemployment Insurance Reconsidered," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 18(3), pages 432-440.
  5. Katz, Lawrence F. & Meyer, Bruce D., 1990. "The impact of the potential duration of unemployment benefits on the duration of unemployment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 45-72, February.
  6. John C. Ham & Samuel Rea, 1986. "Unemployment Insurance and Male Unemployment Duration in Canada," Working Papers 592, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  7. Bruce K. Fallick, 1989. "Unemployment Insurance and the Rate of Re-Employment of Displaced Workers," UCLA Economics Working Papers 550, UCLA Department of Economics.
  8. Narendranathan, W & Stewart, Mark B, 1993. "How Does the Benefit Effect Vary as Unemployment Spells Lengthen?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(4), pages 361-81, Oct.-Dec..
  9. Hunt, Jennifer, 1995. "The Effect of Unemployment Compensation on Unemployment Duration in Germany," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(1), pages 88-120, January.
  10. Bruce D. Meyer, 1988. "Unemployment Insurance And Unemployment Spells," NBER Working Papers 2546, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Groot, Wim, 1990. "The effects of benefits and duration dependence on re-employment probabilities," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 371-376, April.
  12. van den Berg, Gerard J, 1990. "Search Behaviour, Transitions to Nonparticipation and the Duration of Unemployment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(402), pages 842-65, September.
  13. James J. Heckman & V. Joseph Hotz & James R. Walker, . "New Evidence on the Timing and Spacing of Births," University of Chicago - Population Research Center 85-1, Chicago - Population Research Center.
  14. Blau, David M & Robins, Philip K, 1990. "Job Search Outcomes for the Employed and Unemployed," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(3), pages 637-55, June.
  15. Wadsworth, J., 1989. "Unemployment Benefits And Search Effort In The Uk Labour Market," Papers 333, London School of Economics - Centre for Labour Economics.
  16. Dipak C. Jain & Naufel J. Vilcassim, 1991. "Investigating Household Purchase Timing Decisions: A Conditional Hazard Function Approach," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 10(1), pages 1-23.
  17. Heckman, J & Singer, B, 1984. "The Identifiability of the Proportional Hazard Model," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(2), pages 231-41, April.
  18. Katherine Terrell & Michaela Erbenova & Vit Sorm, 1998. "Work incentive and other effects of social assistance and unemployment benefit policy in the Czech Republic," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 23(1/2), pages 87-120.
  19. Lynch, Lisa M, 1989. "The Youth Labor Market in the Eighties: Determinants of Re-employment Probabilities for Young Men and Women," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 71(1), pages 37-45, February.
  20. Lancaster, Tony, 1979. "Econometric Methods for the Duration of Unemployment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(4), pages 939-56, July.
  21. Catalin Pauna & John S. Earle, 1998. "Long-term unemployment, social assistance and labor market policies in Romania," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 23(1/2), pages 203-235.
  22. Nickell, Stephen J, 1979. "Estimating the Probability of Leaving Unemployment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(5), pages 1249-66, September.
  23. Gyula Nagy & John Micklewright, 1998. "Unemployment assistance in Hungary," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 23(1/2), pages 155-175.
  24. Hujer, Reinhard & Schneider, Hilmar, 1989. "The analysis of labor market mobility using panel data," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(2-3), pages 530-536, March.
  25. Carling, Kenneth & Edin, Per-Anders & Harkman, Anders & Holmlund, Bertil, 1996. "Unemployment duration, unemployment benefits, and labor market programs in Sweden," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(3), pages 313-334, March.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hpe:journl:y:2004:v:171:i:4:p:133-156. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ana Belén Miquel Burgos)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.