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The Formation of Immigrant Networks in the Short and the Long Run

Listed author(s):
  • Gil S. Epstein

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel
    Center for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), University College London (UCL), London WC1H 0AX, UK
    Institute of the Study of Labor (IZA), Bonn 53229, Germany)

  • Odelia Heizler-Cohen

    ()

    (Tel-Aviv-Yaffo Academic College, Tel-Aviv-Yaffo 6818211, Israel
    Institute of the Study of Labor (IZA), Bonn 53229, Germany)

In this paper, we present a formal framework of possible network formations among immigrants. After arriving in the new country, one of the new immigrant’s important decisions is with whom to maintain a link in the foreign country. We find that the behavior of the first two immigrants affects all those who come after them. We also find that in the long run, under specific conditions, the first immigrant will become the leader of the immigrant society. Over time, as the stock of immigrants in the host country increases, the investment in the link with the leader will increase as well.

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Article provided by MDPI, Open Access Journal in its journal Economies.

Volume (Year): 4 (2016)
Issue (Month): 3 (July)
Pages: 1-16

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Handle: RePEc:gam:jecomi:v:4:y:2016:i:3:p:15-:d:75090
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