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Internet Education and Economic Growth: Evidence from Cross-Country Regressions

Author

Listed:
  • Lawrence Jin

    () (College of Arts and Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA)

  • Jang C. Jin

    () (Department of Economics, George Mason University-Korea, Songdo Global Campus, Incheon 406-840, Korea)

Abstract

The effects of Internet education on economic growth are examined using a cross-section of 36 high-income countries. Internet usage rates are employed as a proxy for Internet education across countries. Regression results show that the frequent usage of the Internet has a positive and significant effect on economic growth. The estimated growth effect of Internet skills is also found to be greater than the growth effect of math and science skills. The results are, in general, robust across model specifications.

Suggested Citation

  • Lawrence Jin & Jang C. Jin, 2014. "Internet Education and Economic Growth: Evidence from Cross-Country Regressions," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 2(1), pages 1-17, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jecomi:v:2:y:2014:i:1:p:78-94:d:34226
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Eric Hanushek & Ludger Woessmann, 2012. "Do better schools lead to more growth? Cognitive skills, economic outcomes, and causation," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 17(4), pages 267-321, December.
    2. Lars-Hendrik Roller & Leonard Waverman, 2001. "Telecommunications Infrastructure and Economic Development: A Simultaneous Approach," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(4), pages 909-923, September.
    3. Stephen D. Oliner & Daniel E. Sichel, 2000. "The Resurgence of Growth in the Late 1990s: Is Information Technology the Story?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 3-22, Fall.
    4. Miranda, Luiz C.M. & Lima, Carlos A.S., 2012. "Trends and cycles of the internet evolution and worldwide impacts," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 79(4), pages 744-765.
    5. Hanushek, Eric A. & Woessmann, Ludger, 2011. "The Economics of International Differences in Educational Achievement," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    6. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    7. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
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    9. Jerik Hanushek & Dennis Kimko, 2006. "Schooling, Labor-force Quality, and the Growth of Nations," Educational Studies, Higher School of Economics, issue 1, pages 154-193.
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    Cited by:

    1. Md Aslam Mia & Shamima Nasrin & Zhang Cheng, 2016. "Quality, quantity and financial sustainability of microfinance: Does resource allocation matter?," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 1285-1298, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Internet usage rates; economic growth; human capital; schooling; convergence hypothesis;

    JEL classification:

    • E - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics
    • F - International Economics
    • I - Health, Education, and Welfare
    • J - Labor and Demographic Economics
    • O - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth
    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics

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