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Projecting the Economic Impact of the Internet

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  • Robert E. Litan
  • Alice M. Rivlin

Abstract

In this paper we analyze the impact of the Internet on the performance of the economy and the standard of living of average Americans. Our analyses illustrate that even though the stock market’s speculative bubble has burst, the Internet will continue to have a significant impact on old economy industries and as a result generate real benefits for the overall economy.
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Suggested Citation

  • Robert E. Litan & Alice M. Rivlin, 2001. "Projecting the Economic Impact of the Internet," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 313-317, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:91:y:2001:i:2:p:313-317
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.91.2.313
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.91.2.313
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dale W. Jorgenson & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2000. "Raising the Speed Limit: U.S. Economic Growth in the Information Age," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 31(1), pages 125-236.
    2. Robert J. Gordon, 2000. "Does the "New Economy" Measure Up to the Great Inventions of the Past?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 49-74, Fall.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • L86 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Information and Internet Services; Computer Software
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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