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Contribution of ICT Use to Output and Labour-Productivity Growth in Canada

  • Hashmat Khan
  • Marjorie Santos

No abstract is available for this item.

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File URL: http://www.bankofcanada.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/wp02-7.pdf
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Paper provided by Bank of Canada in its series Working Papers with number 02-7.

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Length: 29 pages Abstract: There is ample evidence that information and communication technologies (ICT) contributed significantly to the surge in output and labour-productivity growth in the United States in the late 1990s. Does Canada share the U.S. experience? Has ICT influenced the trend productivity and output growth? Answers to these questions will help improve the Bank’s forecasts of inflationary pressures. This paper examines the first question. A simple growth-accounting exercise suggests that, in contrast to the United States, Canada did not experience an acceleration in the contributions of ICT use to output and labour-productivity growth.
Date of creation: 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bca:bocawp:02-7
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  1. Greenwood, J. & Hercowitz, Z. & Krusell, P., 1995. "Long-Run Implications of Investment-Specific Technological Change," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 9510, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.
  2. Robert J. Gordon, 2000. "Does the "New Economy" Measure Up to the Great Inventions of the Past?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 49-74, Fall.
  3. Karl Whelan, 2000. "Computers, obsolescence, and productivity," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2000-06, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  4. Michael R. Pakko, 2001. "What happens when the technology growth trend changes?: transition dynamics, capital growth and the "new economy"," Working Papers 2001-020, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  5. Hasan Bakhshi & Jens Larsen, 2001. "Investment-specific technological progress in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 129, Bank of England.
  6. Dale W. Jorgenson & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2000. "Raising the Speed Limit: US Economic Growth in the Information Age," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 261, OECD Publishing.
  7. Joseph H. Haimowitz, 1998. "Has the surge in computer spending fundamentally changed the economy?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II, pages 27-42.
  8. Stiroh, Kevin J, 2002. "Are ICT Spillovers Driving the New Economy?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 48(1), pages 33-57, March.
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