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The contribution of information and communication technologies to growth in Europe and the US: A macroeconomic analysis

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  • Werner Roeger

Abstract

The assessment and monitoring of the effects of various tax reforms in Member States has become a key policy concern in the Community. In the Presidency Conclusions of the Lisbon European Council on 23-24 March 2000, the European Council requested the Council and the Commission to assess "the contribution of public finances to growth and employment, and assessing, on the basis of comparable data and indicators, whether adequate concrete measures are being taken in order to … alleviate the tax pressure on labour …". Such an evaluation needs an accurate, timely and comparable system of tax indicators enabling the Commission and the Council to quantify the early impact of tax reforms on the tax rates on labour, capital and consumption. This paper presents a proposal for such a system, discusses its properties and compares it with other available sets of tax rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Werner Roeger, 2001. "The contribution of information and communication technologies to growth in Europe and the US: A macroeconomic analysis," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 147, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
  • Handle: RePEc:euf:ecopap:0147
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Daveri, 2002. "The New Economy in Europe, 1992--2001," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(3), pages 345-362.
    2. Kieran Mc Morrow & Werner Roeger, 2001. "Potential Output: Measurement Methods, "New" Economy Influences and Scenarios for 2001-2010 - A comparison of the EU-15 and the US," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 150, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    3. A. Houben & J. Kakes, 2001. "Fostering the 'New Economy': the role of financial intermediation," MEB Series (discontinued) 2001-7, Netherlands Central Bank, Monetary and Economic Policy Department.
    4. Slevin, Geraldine, 2005. "Y a-t-il une nouvelle économie en Irlande?," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 81(1), pages 111-142, Mars-Juin.

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