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International technological spillovers from ICT-producing manufacturing industries: a panel data analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Carmen Lopez-Pueyo
  • Jaime Sanau
  • Sara Barcenilla

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of the international diffusion of technological capacity from ICT sectors on the total factor productivity in developed countries. Special attention is paid to the construction of a more recent and homogeneous industry-level data set using unit value ratios and a hedonic price index. A cointegration analysis is performed on this annual panel data for 10 manufacturing sectors in six OECD countries over the period 1979-2001. On the basis of our results, we may conclude that a country receives more international technology spillovers in its manufacturing industries the closer its relations with more technologically advanced nations are and the more open it is to imports. Meanwhile, information and communication technologies developed abroad increase the total factor productivity of each of the manufacturing sectors of a country, and this effect is enhanced where ICT goods are imported from nations with advanced technology of this kind.

Suggested Citation

  • Carmen Lopez-Pueyo & Jaime Sanau & Sara Barcenilla, 2009. "International technological spillovers from ICT-producing manufacturing industries: a panel data analysis," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(2), pages 215-231.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:irapec:v:23:y:2009:i:2:p:215-231
    DOI: 10.1080/02692170802700583
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Keller, Wolfgang, 2000. "Do Trade Patterns and Technology Flows Affect Productivity Growth?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(1), pages 17-47, January.
    2. Susanto Basu & John G. Fernald & Nicholas Oulton & Sylaja Srinivasan, 2003. "The Case of the Missing Productivity Growth: Or, Does Information Technology Explain why Productivity Accelerated in the US but not the UK?," NBER Working Papers 10010, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. William D. Nordhaus, 2000. "Alternative Methods for Measuring Productivity Growth," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1282, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    4. Susanto Basu & John G. Fernald & Nicholas Oulton & Sylaja Srinivasan, 2003. "The case of the missing productivity growth: or, does information technology explain why productivity accelerated in the United States but not the United Kingdom?," Working Paper Series WP-03-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    5. Stefano Scarpetta & Andrea Bassanini & Dirk Pilat & Paul Schreyer, 2000. "Economic Growth in the OECD Area: Recent Trends at the Aggregate and Sectoral Level," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 248, OECD Publishing.
    6. Mombert Hoppe, 2005. "Technology Transfer Through Trade," Working Papers 2005.19, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
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    Cited by:

    1. López-Pueyo, Carmen & Mancebón, María-Jesús, 2010. "Innovation, accumulation and assimilation: Three sources of productivity growth in ICT industries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 268-285, March.
    2. Klimis Vogiatzoglou, 2009. "Determinants of Export Specialization in ICT Products: A Cross-Country Analysis," Working Papers 2009.3, International Network for Economic Research - INFER.

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