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Patterns of interstate migration in the United States from the survey of income and program participation

  • Rubén Hernández-Murillo
  • Lesli S. Ott
  • Michael T. Owyang
  • Denise Whalen

The authors describe the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) as a data source for migration studies. The SIPP is a panel dataset that provides information on income, employment outcomes, and participation in government programs. Survey participants are interviewed for up to four years even if they move to a new household or that household migrates within the United States. This unique longitudinal design gives the survey a strong advantage over traditional data sources. The authors illustrate differences in the propensity for interstate migration among different demographic groups over the 12-year period from 1996 to 2008. They also analyze the relationship between migration choices and life-changing events, such as becoming jobless or dissolution of a marriage. Their findings suggest that future research should consider the migration choices of individuals near retirement age.

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Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis in its journal Review.

Volume (Year): (2011)
Issue (Month): May ()
Pages: 169-186

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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlrv:y:2011:i:may:p:169-186:n:v.93no.3
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  1. Joshua L. Rosenbloom & William A. Sundstrom, 2003. "The Decline and Rise of Interstate Migration in the United States: Evidence from the IPUMS, 1850-1990," NBER Working Papers 9857, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Kasey Buckles & Andreas Hagemann & Ofer Malamud & Melinda S. Morrill & Abigail K. Wozniak, 2013. "The Effect of College Education on Health," NBER Working Papers 19222, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Robert A. Nakosteen & Olle Westerlund & Michael Zimmer, 2008. "Migration And Self-Selection: Measured Earnings And Latent Characteristics," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(4), pages 769-788.
  4. Joan R. Rodgers & John L. Rodgers, 2000. "The Effect of Geographic Mobility on Male Labor-Force Participants in the United States ," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 21(1), pages 117-132, January.
  5. George J. Borjas & Stephen G. Bronars & Stephen J. Trejo, 1992. "Self-Selection and Internal Migration in the United States," NBER Working Papers 4002, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Abigail Wozniak, 2010. "Are College Graduates More Responsive to Distant Labor Market Opportunities?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(4), pages 944-970.
  7. Paul S. Davies & Michael J. Greenwood & Haizheng Li, 2001. "A Conditional Logit Approach to U.S. State-to-State Migration," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(2), pages 337-360.
  8. Jeffrey J. Yankow, 2003. "Migration, Job Change, and Wage Growth: A New Perspective on the Pecuniary Return to Geographic Mobility," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(3), pages 483-516.
  9. Blank, Rebecca M., 1988. "The effect of welfare and wage levels on the location decisions of female-headed households," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 186-211, September.
  10. Chan, Sewin, 2001. "Spatial Lock-in: Do Falling House Prices Constrain Residential Mobility?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 567-586, May.
  11. Saks, Raven E. & Wozniak, Abigail, 2007. "Labor Reallocation over the Business Cycle: New Evidence from Internal Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 2766, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. McKinley L. Blackburn, 2010. "Internal migration and the earnings of married couples in the United States," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(1), pages 87-111, January.
  13. Ronald L. Whisler & Brigitte S. Waldorf & Gordon F. Mulligan & David A. Plane, 2008. "Quality of Life and the Migration of the College-Educated: A Life-Course Approach," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(1), pages 58-94.
  14. Emek Basker, 2003. "Education, Job Search and Migration," Labor and Demography 0303003, EconWPA.
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