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Seasonal and Business Cycles of U.S. Employment

Author

Listed:
  • Menelik Geremew
  • Francois Gourio

Abstract

The authors document several facts about the seasonality of U.S. employment, including its marked decline since the 1960s. In addition, they find there is little evidence that industries or states that are more seasonal are also more sensitive to the business cycle, contrary to some previous studies.

Suggested Citation

  • Menelik Geremew & Francois Gourio, 2018. "Seasonal and Business Cycles of U.S. Employment," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue 3, pages 1-28.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedhep:00032
    DOI: doi.org/10.21033/ep-2018-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Krane, Spencer & Wascher, William, 1999. "The cyclical sensitivity of seasonality in U.S. employment," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 523-553, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mutascu, Mihai, 2019. "Phillips curve in US: New insights in time and frequency," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 85-96.
    2. John M. Coglianese & Brendan M. Price, 2020. "Income in the Off-Season: Household Adaptation to Yearly Work Interruptions," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2020-084, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. John Coglianese & Brendan M. Price, 2020. "Income in the Off-Season: Household Adaptation to Yearly Work Interruptions," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 20-337, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

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