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Keynesian economics: can it return if it never died?

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  • Barry Eichengreen

    (University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA)

Abstract

Appreciation of the Keynesian synthesis was enhanced by the events of the last decade. The global financial crisis highlighted the fragility of financial markets and the capriciousness of animal spirits. The depth of the downturn pointed to the value of not just automatic stabilizers but also discretionary fiscal policy as tools of macroeconomic management. Keynesian models and not their New Classical challengers provided the practical analytical framework for policy design. Models of the anti-Keynesian effects of fiscal consolidation received little support from actual consolidation experience. The secular-stagnation debate that followed the crisis lent legitimacy to the view that policy-makers with fiscal space were wise to use it.

Suggested Citation

  • Barry Eichengreen, 2020. "Keynesian economics: can it return if it never died?," Review of Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 8(1), pages 23-35, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:rokejn:v:8:y:2020:i:1:p23-35
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Drakopoulos, Stavros A., 2020. "The Marginalization of Absolute and Relative Income Hypotheses of Consumption and the Role of Fiscal Policy," MPRA Paper 98569, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Keynesian economics; monetary polocy; fiscal policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • B00 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - General - - - History of Economic Thought, Methodology, and Heterodox Approaches
    • E00 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - General

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