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From State to Market: Private Participation in China’s Urban Infrastructure Sectors, 1992–2008

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  • Zhang, Yanlong

Abstract

Public–private partnership (PPP) has gained popularity during the market-oriented reforms in China’s urban infrastructure sectors. This paper explores how city characteristics, spatial pressures, and other institutional forces condition the extent of liberalization reforms in local infrastructure markets. The findings advance the policy diffusion literature by suggesting that the different diffusion mechanisms not only function independently, but also moderate each other’s effects under certain conditions. Specifically, this research finds that the effects of peer pressure undermine the effects of spatial exposure, and the influence of provincial government reduces the effectiveness of peer pressure and epistemic influences.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhang, Yanlong, 2014. "From State to Market: Private Participation in China’s Urban Infrastructure Sectors, 1992–2008," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 473-486.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:64:y:2014:i:c:p:473-486
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2014.06.023
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. McDonald, David A., 2016. "To corporatize or not to corporatize (and if so, how?)," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 107-114.
    2. Shiying Shi & Heap-Yih Chong & Lihong Liu & Xiaosu Ye, 2016. "Examining the Interrelationship among Critical Success Factors of Public Private Partnership Infrastructure Projects," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(12), pages 1-20, December.

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