IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/tefoso/v173y2021ics004016252100617x.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Finding your feet in constrained markets: How bottom of pyramid social enterprises adjust to scale-up-technology-enabled healthcare delivery

Author

Listed:
  • Chaudhuri, Atanu
  • Prætorius, Thim
  • Narayanamurthy, Gopalakrishnan
  • Hasle, Peter
  • Pereira, Vijay

Abstract

Scaling social impact is a challenge that innovative social firms operating in resource-constrained Bottom of Pyramid markets must address while also ensuring profitability. However, how scaling occurs is scarcely understood. By building on the case studies of two healthcare social enterprises located in India, we make four important contributions to the understanding of the scaling up process. First, we demonstrate that entrepreneurial adjustments are guided by whether social firms prioritize alleviating their internal constraints or those faced by customers. Second, we show how such dynamic prioritization of constraints influences how firms mobilize resources and use operating routines from inception to market establishment. Third, we illustrate how, by pursuing resource mobilization strategies and operating routines, firms generate a ‘deep’ impact by expanding the number and type of their activities or a ‘broad’ one by increasing their membership base and/or geographic area. Finally, our findings show that the prioritization of internal or customer constraints leads firms to establish different sequences of elements of institutional legitimacy—i.e., normative, regulatory, and cognitive ones. We conclude by presenting the development of a process model for scaling-up social firms, by developing our propositions and by discussing the implications of our findings.

Suggested Citation

  • Chaudhuri, Atanu & Prætorius, Thim & Narayanamurthy, Gopalakrishnan & Hasle, Peter & Pereira, Vijay, 2021. "Finding your feet in constrained markets: How bottom of pyramid social enterprises adjust to scale-up-technology-enabled healthcare delivery," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 173(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:tefoso:v:173:y:2021:i:c:s004016252100617x
    DOI: 10.1016/j.techfore.2021.121184
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S004016252100617X
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1016/j.techfore.2021.121184?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hockerts, Kai & Wüstenhagen, Rolf, 2010. "Greening Goliaths versus emerging Davids -- Theorizing about the role of incumbents and new entrants in sustainable entrepreneurship," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 481-492, September.
    2. V. Kasturi Rangan & R. D. Thulasiraj, 2007. "Making Sight Affordable (Innovations Case Narrative: The Aravind Eye Care System)," Innovations: Technology, Governance, Globalization, MIT Press, vol. 2(4), pages 35-49, October.
    3. Agarwal, Nivedita & Chakrabarti, Ronika & Brem, Alexander & Bocken, Nancy, 2018. "Market driving at Bottom of the Pyramid (BoP): An analysis of social enterprises from the healthcare sector," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 234-244.
    4. Paul N. Bloom & Brett R. Smith, 2010. "Identifying the Drivers of Social Entrepreneurial Impact: Theoretical Development and an Exploratory Empirical Test of SCALERS," Journal of Social Entrepreneurship, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 126-145, March.
    5. Javier Reynoso & Ana Valdés & Karla Cabrera, 2015. "Breaking new ground: base-of-pyramid service research," The Service Industries Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(13), pages 695-709, September.
    6. Garud, Raghu & Karnoe, Peter, 2003. "Bricolage versus breakthrough: distributed and embedded agency in technology entrepreneurship," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 277-300, February.
    7. Mair, Johanna & Marti, Ignasi, 2009. "Entrepreneurship in and around institutional voids: A case study from Bangladesh," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 419-435, September.
    8. Geoffrey Desa & James L. Koch, 2014. "Scaling Social Impact: Building Sustainable Social Ventures at the Base-of-the-Pyramid," Journal of Social Entrepreneurship, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2), pages 146-174, May.
    9. John Bessant & Lynne Maher, 2009. "Developing Radical Service Innovations In Healthcare — The Role Of Design Methods," International Journal of Innovation Management (ijim), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 13(04), pages 555-568.
    10. Seelos, Christian & Mair, Johanna, 2005. "Social entrepreneurship: Creating new business models to serve the poor," Business Horizons, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 241-246.
    11. Frances Stewart, 1978. "Technology and Underdevelopment," Palgrave Macmillan Books, Palgrave Macmillan, edition 0, number 978-1-349-15932-1, September.
    12. Uvin, Peter, 1995. "Fighting hunger at the grassroots: Paths to scaling up," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 927-939, June.
    13. Paula Linna, 2013. "Bricolage As A Means Of Innovating In A Resource-Scarce Environment: A Study Of Innovator-Entrepreneurs At The Bop," Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship (JDE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 18(03), pages 1-23.
    14. Babita Bhatt & Israr Qureshi & Suhaib Riaz, 2019. "Social Entrepreneurship in Non-munificent Institutional Environments and Implications for Institutional Work: Insights from China," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 154(3), pages 605-630, February.
    15. Wiprächtiger, David & Narayanamurthy, Gopalakrishnan & Moser, Roger & Sengupta, Tuhin, 2019. "Access-based business model innovation in frontier markets: Case study of shared mobility in Timor-Leste," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 224-238.
    16. Geoffrey Desa, 2012. "Resource Mobilization in International Social Entrepreneurship: Bricolage as a Mechanism of Institutional Transformation," Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, , vol. 36(4), pages 727-751, July.
    17. Dieleman, Marleen & Sachs, Wladimir M., 2008. "Economies of connectedness: Concept and application," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 270-285, September.
    18. Parker, Simon C., 2006. "Learning about the unknown: How fast do entrepreneurs adjust their beliefs?," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 1-26, January.
    19. Bucher, Silke & Jäger, Urs & Prado, Andrea M., 2016. "Scaling private health care for the base of the pyramid: Expanding versus broadening service offerings in developing nations," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 736-750.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Huimin Li & Jianyuan Huang & Jiayun Liu, 2022. "External Support for Elderly Care Social Enterprises in China: A Government-Society-Family Framework of Analysis," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 19(14), pages 1-22, July.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Matthew P. Johnson & Stefan Schaltegger, 2020. "Entrepreneurship for Sustainable Development: A Review and Multilevel Causal Mechanism Framework," Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, , vol. 44(6), pages 1141-1173, November.
    2. Reypens, Lina & Bacq, Sophie & Milanov, Hana, 2021. "Beyond bricolage: Early-stage technology venture resource mobilization in resource-scarce contexts," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 36(4).
    3. Onwuegbuzie, Henrietta N. & Mafimisebi, Oluwasoye P., 2021. "Global relevance of scaling African indigenous entrepreneurship," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 166(C).
    4. Gupta, Parul & Chauhan, Sumedha & Paul, Justin & Jaiswal, M.P., 2020. "Social entrepreneurship research: A review and future research agenda," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 209-229.
    5. Liu, Wentong & Kwong, Caleb C.Y. & Kim, Young-Ah & Liu, Hongfei, 2021. "The more the better vs. less is more: Strategic alliances, bricolage and social performance in social enterprises," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 137(C), pages 128-142.
    6. Witell, Lars & Gebauer, Heiko & Jaakkola, Elina & Hammedi, Wafa & Patricio, Lia & Perks, Helen, 2017. "A bricolage perspective on service innovation," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 290-298.
    7. Syrus M Islam, 2022. "Social impact scaling strategies in social enterprises: A systematic review and research agenda," Australian Journal of Management, Australian School of Business, vol. 47(2), pages 298-321, May.
    8. Busch, Christian & Barkema, Harry, 2022. "Align or perish: Social enterprise network orchestration in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 37(2).
    9. Aura Parmentier-Cajaiba & Nathalie Lazaric & Giovany Cajaiba-Santana, 2021. "The effortful process of routines emergence: the interplay of entrepreneurial actions and artefacts," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 33-63, January.
    10. Islam, Syrus M., 2020. "Towards an integrative definition of scaling social impact in social enterprises," Journal of Business Venturing Insights, Elsevier, vol. 13(C).
    11. Sahasranamam, Sreevas & Nandakumar, M.K., 2020. "Individual capital and social entrepreneurship: Role of formal institutions," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 104-117.
    12. Markus Perkmann & André Spicer, 2014. "How Emerging Organizations Take Form: The Role of Imprinting and Values in Organizational Bricolage," Organization Science, INFORMS, vol. 25(6), pages 1785-1806, December.
    13. Maria Margarida Avillez & Andrew Greenman & Susan Marlow, 2020. "Ethical Judgments About Social Entrepreneurship in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Influence of Spatio-Cultural Meanings," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 161(4), pages 877-892, February.
    14. Xiaoyu Yu & Yajie Li & Zhongfeng Su & Yida Tao & Bang Nguyen & Fan Xia, 2020. "Entrepreneurial bricolage and its effects on new venture growth and adaptiveness in an emerging economy," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 1141-1163, December.
    15. Andrew Ngawenja Mzembe & Yvonne Novakovic & Frans Melissen & Grace Kamanga, 2019. "Institutional bricolage as an antecedent of social value creation in a developing country's tourism and hospitality industry," Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 26(4), pages 997-1008, July.
    16. Xiaoyu Yu & Yajie Li & Daniel Q. Chen & Xiaotong Meng & Xiangming Tao, 2019. "Entrepreneurial bricolage and online store performance in emerging economies," Electronic Markets, Springer;IIM University of St. Gallen, vol. 29(2), pages 167-185, June.
    17. Xiangping Jia & Geoffrey Desa, 2020. "Social entrepreneurship and impact investment in rural–urban transformation: An orientation to systemic social innovation and symposium findings," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 37(4), pages 1217-1239, December.
    18. Geoffrey Desa, 2012. "Resource Mobilization in International Social Entrepreneurship: Bricolage as a Mechanism of Institutional Transformation," Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, , vol. 36(4), pages 727-751, July.
    19. Sahasranamam, Sreevas & Nandakumar, M.K. & Pereira, Vijay & Temouri, Yama, 2021. "Knowledge capital in social and commercial entrepreneurship: Investigating the role of informal institutions," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 27(1).
    20. Hertel, Christina & Binder, Julia & Fauchart, Emmanuelle, 2021. "Getting more from many—A framework of community resourcefulness in new venture creation," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 36(3).

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:tefoso:v:173:y:2021:i:c:s004016252100617x. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00401625 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Catherine Liu (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00401625 .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.