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Innovation, imitation and policy inaction

Author

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  • Cerqueti, Roy
  • Quaranta, Anna Grazia
  • Ventura, Marco

Abstract

The paper deals with the controversial issue of intellectual property rights. We deal with an optimization problem to model the optimal government's behavior in presence of dynamic uncertainty and intervention costs. More specifically, we search for the optimal strategies to be implemented by a policy maker to optimally balance the number of innovators and imitators. The problem is first tackled from a purely theoretical perspective and then by implementing extensive numerical simulations on the basis of empirical data. By the theoretical perspective, we obtain a rigorous proof that optimal strategies depend on the initial value of the number of imitators and not on the initial ratio between innovators and imitators, whereas the simulations provide us with intuitive insights from an economic point of view, along with a validation of the theoretical results. The results support the evidence that governments choose the possible widest bandwidth and minimize the size of interventions so as to curb intervention costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Cerqueti, Roy & Quaranta, Anna Grazia & Ventura, Marco, 2016. "Innovation, imitation and policy inaction," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 22-30.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:tefoso:v:111:y:2016:i:c:p:22-30
    DOI: 10.1016/j.techfore.2016.06.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Imitation; Innovation; Intellectual property; Inaction region; Optimization model; Numerical simulation;

    JEL classification:

    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O34 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Intellectual Property and Intellectual Capital
    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques

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