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The Impact of Fan Attitudes on Intentions to Watch Professional Basketball Teams on Television

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  • Mahony, Daniel F.
  • Moorman, Anita M.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine conditions impacting fans' preference for watching their most disliked team and their favourite team. Previous work found that National Football League fans clearly preferred watching the favourite team, but only preferred watching the disliked team when it was a threat to the favourite. Using the Psychological Commitment to Team (PCT) scale to segment National Basketball Association fans, the current study found both high and low PCT fans preferred watching the disliked team when it was a threat to the favourite team. However, only high PCT fans preferred watching the disliked team when it was likely to lose. Finally, high PCT fans were more likely to watch the favourite team regardless of the conditions, while low PCT fans were significantly less likely to watch the favourite team when it was likely to lose.

Suggested Citation

  • Mahony, Daniel F. & Moorman, Anita M., 1999. "The Impact of Fan Attitudes on Intentions to Watch Professional Basketball Teams on Television," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 43-66, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:spomar:v:2:y:1999:i:1:p:43-66
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fazio, Russell H & Powell, Martha C & Williams, Carol J, 1989. "The Role of Attitude Accessibility in the Attitude-to-Behavior Process," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 280-289, December.
    2. Calder, Bobby J & Phillips, Lynn W & Tybout, Alice M, 1981. "Designing Research for Application," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(2), pages 197-207, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Funk, Daniel C. & James, Jeff, 2001. "The Psychological Continuum Model: A Conceptual Framework for Understanding an Individual's Psychological Connection to Sport," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 119-150, November.
    2. Funk, Daniel C. & Haugtvedt, Curtis P. & Howard, Dennis R., 2000. "Contemporary Attitude Theory in Sport: Theoretical Considerations and Implications," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 125-144, November.
    3. Sung, Hojun & Mills, Brian M. & Tainsky, Scott, 2017. "From schadenfreude to mitfreude? Estimating viewership loss and rivalrous relationships in otherwise neutral markets," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 159-169.
    4. Cunningham, George B. & Kwon, Hyungil, 2003. "The Theory of Planned Behaviour and Intentions to Attend a Sport Event," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 127-145, November.
    5. Havard, Cody T., 2014. "Glory Out of Reflected Failure: The examination of how rivalry affects sport fans," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 243-253.
    6. Funk, Daniel C. & James, Jeffrey D., 2004. "The Fan Attitude Network (FAN) Model: Exploring Attitude Formation and Change among Sport Consumers," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 1-26, May.
    7. Murray, Duncan & Howat, Gary, 2002. "The Relationships among Service Quality, Value, Satisfaction, and Future Intentions of Customers at an Australian Sports and Leisure Centre," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 25-43, May.
    8. Delia, Elizabeth B., 2015. "The exclusiveness of group identity in celebrations of team success," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 396-406.
    9. Cody T. Havard & Frederick G. Grieve & Megan E. Lomenick, 2020. "Marvel, DC, and Sport: Investigating Rivalry in the Sport and Comic Settings," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 101(3), pages 1075-1089, May.
    10. Drayer, Joris & Shapiro, Stephen L. & Dwyer, Brendan & Morse, Alan L. & White, Joel, 2010. "The effects of fantasy football participation on NFL consumption: A qualitative analysis," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 129-141, May.
    11. Jae Seo, Won & Christine Green, B. & Jae Ko, Yong & Lee, Seunghwan & Schenewark, Jarrod, 2007. "The Effect of Web Cohesion, Web Commitment, and Attitude toward the Website on Intentions to Use NFL Teams' Websites," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 231-252, November.

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