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Pappa Ante Portas: The effect of the husband's retirement on the wife's mental health in Japan

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  • Bertoni, Marco
  • Brunello, Giorgio

Abstract

The “Retired Husband Syndrome”, that affects the mental health of wives of retired men around the world, has been anecdotally documented but never formally investigated. Using Japanese micro-data and the exogenous variation across cohorts in the maximum age of guaranteed employment induced by a 2006 Japanese reform, we estimate that the husband's earlier retirement significantly increases the probability that the wife reports symptoms related to the syndrome. We also find that retirement has a negative effect both on the household's economic situation and on the husband's own mental health, and that the higher economic distress contributes to reducing the wife's mental health.

Suggested Citation

  • Bertoni, Marco & Brunello, Giorgio, 2017. "Pappa Ante Portas: The effect of the husband's retirement on the wife's mental health in Japan," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 175(C), pages 135-142.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:175:y:2017:i:c:p:135-142
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.01.012
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    Cited by:

    1. Tobias Mueller, Mujaheed Shaikh, 2017. "Your Retirement and My Health Behavior: Evidence on Retirement Externalities from a fuzzy regression discontinuity design," Diskussionsschriften dp1709, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.
    2. repec:eee:jhecon:v:57:y:2018:i:c:p:45-59 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Japan; Mental health; Stress; Couples; Retirement; Pension reforms;

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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