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Risk information processing and rational ignoring in the health context

  • Osimani, Barbara
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    Findings about the desire for health-risk information are heterogeneous and sometimes contradictory. In particular, they seem to be at variance with established psychological theories of information-seeking behavior.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053535711001375
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics).

    Volume (Year): 41 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 169-179

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:41:y:2012:i:2:p:169-179
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620175

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    1. George J. Stigler, 1961. "The Economics of Information," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 69, pages 213.
    2. Barbara E. Kahn & Mary Frances Luce, 2003. "Understanding High-Stakes Consumer Decisions: Mammography Adherence Following False-Alarm Test Results," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 22(3), pages 393-410, April.
    3. Ronald W. Hilton, 1981. "The Determinants of Information Value: Synthesizing Some General Results," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 27(1), pages 57-64, January.
    4. Louis Eeckhoudt & Philippe Godfroid, 2000. "Risk Aversion and the Value of Information," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(4), pages 382-388, December.
    5. Hanoch, Yaniv, 2002. ""Neither an angel nor an ant": Emotion as an aid to bounded rationality," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 1-25, February.
    6. Eeckhoudt, Louis R. & Lebrun, Thérèse C. & Sailly, Jean-Claude L., 1984. "The informative content of diagnostic tests: An economic analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 18(10), pages 873-880, January.
    7. Wilton, Peter C & Myers, John G, 1986. " Task, Expectancy, and Information Assessment Effects in Information Utilization Processes," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(4), pages 469-86, March.
    8. Berg, Nathan & Hoffrage, Ulrich, 2008. "Rational ignoring with unbounded cognitive capacity," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 792-809, December.
    9. Urbany, Joel E, 1986. " An Experimental Examination of the Economics of Information," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(2), pages 257-71, September.
    10. Gould, John P., 1974. "Risk, stochastic preference, and the value of information," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 64-84, May.
    11. T. Lanzi & J. Mathis, 2005. "Consulting an expert with potentially conflicting preferences," THEMA Working Papers 2005-07, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    12. Urbany, Joel E & Dickson, Peter R & Wilkie, William L, 1989. " Buyer Uncertainty and Information Search," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(2), pages 208-15, September.
    13. Mitchell, Terence R. & Beach, Lee Roy, 1990. ""... Do i love thee? Let me count ..." toward an understanding of intuitive and automatic decision making," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 1-20, October.
    14. Gisela B�hm & Hans-R�diger Pfister, 2008. "Anticipated and experienced emotions in environmental risk perception," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 3, pages 73-86, January.
    15. Eric J. Johnson & John W. Payne, 1985. "Effort and Accuracy in Choice," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 31(4), pages 395-414, April.
    16. Moorthy, Sridhar & Ratchford, Brian T & Talukdar, Debabrata, 1997. " Consumer Information Search Revisited: Theory and Empirical Analysis," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 23(4), pages 263-77, March.
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