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Further evidence on the efficiency of the Chinese stock markets: A note


  • Fifield, Suzanne G.M.
  • Jetty, Juliana


This paper examines the efficiency of the Chinese A-share and B-share markets following the deregulation of the B-share market which widened ownership to include domestic investors. Applying parametric and non-parametric variance ratio tests to the daily data of 370 shares over 1996-2005, the paper finds that A-shares are more efficient than B-shares, although the efficiency of both markets has improved following the regulatory change. Overall, the results suggest that the Chinese stock markets are characterised by information asymmetry, although the timely access to high quality information that domestic investors enjoy has improved the efficiency of the B-share market.

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  • Fifield, Suzanne G.M. & Jetty, Juliana, 2008. "Further evidence on the efficiency of the Chinese stock markets: A note," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 351-361, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:riibaf:v:22:y:2008:i:3:p:351-361

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mobarek, Asma & Fiorante, Angelo, 2014. "The prospects of BRIC countries: Testing weak-form market efficiency," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 217-232.
    2. Charles, Amélie & Darné, Olivier, 2009. "The random walk hypothesis for Chinese stock markets: Evidence from variance ratio tests," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 117-126, June.
    3. Bohl, Martin T. & Schuppli, Michael & Siklos, Pierre L., 2010. "Stock return seasonalities and investor structure: Evidence from China's B-share markets," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 190-201, March.
    4. Hung, Jui-Cheng, 2009. "Deregulation and liberalization of the Chinese stock market and the improvement of market efficiency," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 843-857, August.
    5. Juan Benjamín Duarte Duarte & Juan Manuel Mascareñas Pérez-Iñigo, 2014. "¿Han sido los mercados bursátiles eficientes informacionalmente?," REVISTA APUNTES DEL CENES, UNIVERSIDAD PEDAGOGICA Y TECNOLOGICA DE COLOMBIA, June.
    6. Koutmos, Dimitrios & Song, Wei, 2014. "Speculative dynamics and price behavior in the Shanghai Stock Exchange," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 74-86.
    7. Koutmos, Dimitrios, 2016. "Distilling private information from plain-vanilla options to predict future underlying stock price volatility: Evidence from the H-shares of Chinese banks," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 391-405.
    8. Jamaani, Fouad & Roca, Eduardo, 2015. "Are the regional Gulf stock markets weak-form efficient as single stock markets and as a regional stock market?," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 221-246.
    9. Al-Hajieh, Heitham & Redhead, Keith & Rodgers, Timothy, 2011. "Investor sentiment and calendar anomaly effects: A case study of the impact of Ramadan on Islamic Middle Eastern markets," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 345-356, September.
    10. Xu, Lilai & Oh, K.B., 2011. "The stock market in China: An endogenous adjustment process responding to the demands of economic reform and growth," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 36-47, February.

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