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Does patent harmonization impact the decision and volume of high technology trade?

  • Briggs, Kristie
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    The World Intellectual Property Organization identified technology transfer as a key objective to their Development Agenda. Such transfer could be achieved if patent reform in developing countries aids these countries in attracting foreign high-technology exports. Encouragingly, the results of this paper suggest that patent reform in lower-middle income countries attracts new firms into the market, while reform in low income and upper middle income countries encourages existing trade partners to increase export volumes. These results suggest that policies to harmonize patent regimes are, in fact, useful in increasing high technology exports to developing countries.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1059056012000408
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal International Review of Economics & Finance.

    Volume (Year): 25 (2013)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 35-51

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:reveco:v:25:y:2013:i:c:p:35-51
    DOI: 10.1016/j.iref.2012.05.004
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620165

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