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Detecting the existence of space-time clustering of firms


  • Arbia, Giuseppe
  • Espa, Giuseppe
  • Giuliani, Diego
  • Mazzitelli, Andrea


The use of the K-functions (Ripley, 1977) has recently become popular in the analysis of the spatial pattern of firms. It was first introduced in the economic literature by Arbia and Espa (1996) and then popularized by Marcon and Puech (2003), Quah and Simpson (2003), Duranton and Overman (2005), and Arbia et al. (2008). In particular in Arbia et al. (2008) we used Ripley's K-functions as instruments to study the inter-sectoral co-agglomeration pattern of firms in a single moment of time. All this research has followed a static approach by disregarding the time dimension. Temporal dynamics, on the other hand, play a crucial role in understanding the economic and social phenomena particularly when referring to the analysis of the individual choices leading to the observed clusters of economic activities. With respect to previous contributions to the literature, this paper uncovers the process of firm demography by studying the dynamics of localization through space-time K-functions. The empirical part of the paper will focus on the study of the long run localization of firms in the area of Rome (Italy), by concentrating on the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector data collected by the Italian Industrial Union in the period 1920-2005.

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  • Arbia, Giuseppe & Espa, Giuseppe & Giuliani, Diego & Mazzitelli, Andrea, 2010. "Detecting the existence of space-time clustering of firms," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 311-323, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:40:y:2010:i:5:p:311-323

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bade, Franz-Josef & Bode, Eckhardt & Cutrini, Eleonora, 2011. "Does domestic offshoring precede international offshoring? Industry-level evidence," Kiel Working Papers 1699, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    2. Tian, Zheng, 2013. "Measuring Agglomeration Using the Standardized Location Quotient with a Bootstrap Method," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 43(2).
    3. Arnab Bhattacharjee & Taps Maiti & Dennis Petrie, 2014. "Spatial structures of health outcomes and health behaviours in Scotland: Evidence from the Scottish Health Survey," SEEC Discussion Papers 1401, Spatial Economics and Econometrics Centre, Heriot Watt University.
    4. Arbia, Giuseppe & Espa, Giuseppe & Giuliani, Diego & Dickson, Maria Michela, 2014. "Spatio-temporal clustering in the pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturing industry: A geographical micro-level analysis," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 298-304.
    5. Eckhardt Bode & Franz-Josef Bade Bade & Eleonora Cutrini Cutrini, 2011. "Domestic and International Offshoring of Tasks," ERSA conference papers ersa11p1840, European Regional Science Association.
    6. López-Hernández , Fernando A. & Artal-Tur, Andrés & Maté-Sánchez-Val, M. Luz, 2011. "Identifying nonlinear spatial dependence patterns by using non-parametric tests: Evidence for the European Union," INVESTIGACIONES REGIONALES - Journal of REGIONAL RESEARCH, Asociación Española de Ciencia Regional, issue 21, pages 19-36.
    7. Bhattacharjee, Arnab & Maiti, Taps & Petrie, Dennis, 2014. "General equilibrium effects of spatial structure: Health outcomes and health behaviours in Scotland," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 286-297.


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