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Ambiguous effects of tax progressivity -- theory and Danish evidence

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  • Hansen, Claus Thustrup
  • Pedersen, Lars Haagen
  • Slok, Torsten

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  • Hansen, Claus Thustrup & Pedersen, Lars Haagen & Slok, Torsten, 2000. "Ambiguous effects of tax progressivity -- theory and Danish evidence," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 335-347, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:7:y:2000:i:3:p:335-347
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Holmlund, B. & Kolm, A.S., 1995. "Progressive Taxation, Wage Setting, and Unemployment , Theory and Swedish Evidence," Papers 1995-15, Uppsala - Working Paper Series.
    2. Hersoug, Tor, 1984. "Union Wage Responses to Tax Changes," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 36(1), pages 37-51, March.
    3. Ken Binmore & Ariel Rubinstein & Asher Wolinsky, 1986. "The Nash Bargaining Solution in Economic Modelling," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 17(2), pages 176-188, Summer.
    4. Ben Lockwood & Alan Manning, 1993. "Wage Setting and the Tax System: theory and Evidence for the UK," CEP Discussion Papers dp0115, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    5. Christopher A. Pissarides, 1983. "Efficiency Aspects of the Financing of Unemployment Insurance and Other Government Expenditure," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 50(1), pages 57-69.
    6. Koskela, Erkki & Vilmunen, Jouko, 1996. "Tax progression is good for employment in popular models of trade union behaviour," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 65-80, August.
    7. Lockwood, Ben & Manning, Alan, 1993. "Wage setting and the tax system theory and evidence for the United Kingdom," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 1-29, August.
    8. Hansen, Claus Thustrup, 1999. " Lower Tax Progression, Longer Hours and Higher Wages," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 101(1), pages 49-65, March.
    9. Michael Hoel, 1990. "Efficiency wages and income taxes," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 89-99, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kory Kroft & Kucko Kavan & Etienne Lehmann & Johannes Schmieder, 2015. "Optimal Income Taxation with Unemployment and Wage Responses: A Sufficient Statistics Approach," Working Papers hal-01292126, HAL.
    2. Sinko, Pekka, 2004. "Progressive Taxation Under Centralised Wage Setting," Discussion Papers 349, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Immervoll, H., 2000. "Fiscal Drag - An Automatic Stabiliser?," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0025, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    4. Etienne Lehmann & Claudio Lucifora & Simone Moriconi & Bruno Van der Linden, 2016. "Beyond the labour income tax wedge: the unemployment-reducing effect of tax progressivity," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 23(3), pages 454-489, June.
    5. Goerke, Laszlo, 2004. "Tax evasion, tax progression, and efficiency wages," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 35-42, January.
    6. Schneider, Kerstin, 2005. "Union wage setting and progressive income taxation with heterogeneous labor: theory and evidence from the German income tax reforms 1986-1990," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 205-222, April.
    7. Pia Rattenhuber, 2012. "Marginal Taxes: A Good or a Bad for Wages?: The Incidence of the Structure of Income and Labor Taxes on Wages," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1193, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

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