IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/eecrev/v43y1999i9p1723-1746.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Alleviating unemployment:: The case for green tax reforms

Author

Listed:
  • Koskela, Erkki
  • Schob, Ronnie

Abstract

It has been argued recently that imposing taxes on pollution produces additional tax revenues which can then be used to replace labour taxes and thus reap a double dividend in the form of improving environmental quality and alleviating unemployment. This paper analyses the employment effects of revenue-neutral green tax reforms by focusing on the revenue recycling effect on employment. Our model contains three features which are important when looking at the employment effects of green tax reforms: first, there is unemployment in equilibrium, second, wages are determined endogenously and third, various institutional arrangements for taxing unemployment benefits, for the price-indexation of unemployment benefits, and for personal tax allowances are considered. The employment effects of a revenue-neutral green tax reform are sensitive to institutional arrangements concerning taxation and indexation of unemployment benefits and personal tax allowances. A revenue-neutral green tax reform will boost employment if unemployment benefits are untaxed and nominally fixed. Employment actually falls if unemployment benefits are taxed and price indexed. When employment changes, the functional distribution of income also changes. Total private income, after-tax profits, and after-tax labour income increase with employment while transfer income decreases. If the polluting good is normal, a positive employment effect reduces the environmental dividend obtained from a revenue-neutral green tax reform.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Koskela, Erkki & Schob, Ronnie, 1999. "Alleviating unemployment:: The case for green tax reforms," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(9), pages 1723-1746, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:43:y:1999:i:9:p:1723-1746
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014-2921(98)00043-9
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Holmlund, B. & Kolm, A.S., 1995. "Progressive Taxation, Wage Setting, and Unemployment , Theory and Swedish Evidence," Papers 1995-15, Uppsala - Working Paper Series.
    2. Oswald, A. J., 1995. "Efficient contracts are on the labour demand curve: Theory and facts," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 102-102, March.
    3. Bovenberg, A. L. & van der Ploeg, F., 1994. "Environmental policy, public finance and the labour market in a second-best world," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 349-390, November.
    4. de Bovenberg, A Lans & Mooij, Ruud A, 1994. "Environmental Levies and Distortionary Taxation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 1085-1089, September.
    5. Anton B. T. M. Van Schaik & Henri L. F. De Groot, 1998. "Unemployment and Endogenous Growth," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 12(2), pages 189-219, July.
    6. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen & Jackman, Richard, 2005. "Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199279173.
    7. Creedy, John & McDonald, Ian M, 1991. "Models of Trade Union Behaviour: A Synthesis," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 67(199), pages 346-359, December.
    8. Schob, Ronnie, 1996. "Evaluating Tax Reforms in the Presence of Externalities," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 48(4), pages 537-555, October.
    9. Blondal, Sveinbjorn & Pearson, Mark, 1995. "Unemployment and Other Non-employment Benefits," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(1), pages 136-169, Spring.
    10. Erkki Koskela & Ronnie Schöb & Hans-Werner Sinn, 1998. "Pollution, Factor Taxation and Unemployment," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 5(3), pages 379-396, July.
    11. Koskela, Erkki & Vilmunen, Jouko, 1996. "Tax progression is good for employment in popular models of trade union behaviour," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 65-80, August.
    12. Oswald, Andrew J, 1985. " The Economic Theory of Trade Unions: An Introductory Survey," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 87(2), pages 160-193.
    13. Bovenberg, A.L., 1995. "Environmental taxation and employment," Other publications TiSEM db57f00b-741a-483d-a01b-6, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    14. Bovenberg, A. Lans & van der Ploeg, Frederick, 1996. "Optimal taxation, public goods and environmental policy with involuntary unemployment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1-2), pages 59-83, October.
    15. Carraro, Carlo & Galeotti, Marzio & Gallo, Massimo, 1996. "Environmental taxation and unemployment: Some evidence on the 'double dividend hypothesis' in Europe," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1-2), pages 141-181, October.
    16. Søren Nielsen & Lars Pedersen & Peter Sørensen, 1995. "Environmental policy, pollution, unemployment, and endogenous growth," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 2(2), pages 185-205, August.
    17. Bovenberg, A Lans & van der Ploeg, Frederick, 1998. " Tax Reform, Structural Unemployment and the Environment," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 100(3), pages 593-610, September.
    18. Schneider, Kerstin, 1997. " Involuntary Unemployment and Environmental Policy: The Double Dividend Hypothesis," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 99(1), pages 45-49, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:43:y:1999:i:9:p:1723-1746. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eer .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.