IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/labeco/v12y2005i4p511-530.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

You'll never walk alone: Childhood influences and male career path clusters

Author

Listed:
  • Anyadike-Danes, Michael
  • McVicar, Duncan

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Anyadike-Danes, Michael & McVicar, Duncan, 2005. "You'll never walk alone: Childhood influences and male career path clusters," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 511-530, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:12:y:2005:i:4:p:511-530
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0927-5371(05)00035-7
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Joel H. Levine, 2000. "But What Have You Done for Us Lately?," Sociological Methods & Research, , vol. 29(1), pages 34-40, August.
    2. Machin, Stephen & Manning, Alan, 1999. "The causes and consequences of longterm unemployment in Europe," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 47, pages 3085-3139 Elsevier.
    3. Lawrence L. Wu, 2000. "Some Comments on “Sequence Analysis and Optimal Matching Methods in Sociology: Review and Prospectâ€," Sociological Methods & Research, , vol. 29(1), pages 41-64, August.
    4. Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1987. "Estimating a Structural Search Model: The Transition from School to Work," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(4), pages 801-817, July.
    5. Jenkins, Stephen P. & Rigg, John A., 2003. "Disability and disadvantage: selection, onset, and duration effects," ISER Working Paper Series 2003-18, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Cramer, J. S. & Ridder, G., 1991. "Pooling states in the multinomial logit model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 47(2-3), pages 267-272, February.
    7. Stefani Scherer, 1999. "Early Career Patterns - a Comparison of Great Britain and West Germany," MZES Working Papers 7, MZES.
    8. Duncan McVicar & Michael Anyadike-Danes, 2002. "Predicting successful and unsuccessful transitions from school to work by using sequence methods," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 165(2), pages 317-334.
    9. Gregg, Paul, 2001. "The Impact of Youth Unemployment on Adult Unemployment in the NCDS," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(475), pages 626-653, November.
    10. Magnac, Thierry, 2000. "Subsidised Training and Youth Employment: Distinguishing Unobserved Heterogeneity from State Dependence in Labour Market Histories," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(466), pages 805-837, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Dylan Kneale & Ruth Lupton & Polina Obolenskaya & Richard D Wiggins, 2010. "A cross-cohort description of young people's housing experience in Britain over 30 years: An application of Sequence Analysis," DoQSS Working Papers 10-17, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    2. Paolo Lucchino & Dr Richard Dorsett, 2013. "Visualising the school-to-work transition: an analysis using optimal matching," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 414, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    3. Verhaest, Dieter & Schatteman, Tom, 2010. "Overeducation in the early career: an analysis using sequence techniques," Working Papers 2010/09, Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel, Faculteit Economie en Management.
    4. Geraint Johnes, 2009. "Occupation and the labour market participation of women: why do some people trade down jobs when careers are interrupted?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(11), pages 1093-1096.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:12:y:2005:i:4:p:511-530. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/labeco .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.