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Occupation and the labour market participation of women: why do some people trade down jobs when careers are interrupted?

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  • Geraint Johnes

Abstract

A dynamic structural discrete choice model of labour market participation, schooling and occupational choice is applied to data for women drawn from the British Cohort Study. It is established that, for relatively highly educated workers, the return attached to childrearing is higher in the part-time non-managerial work regime than in the part-time managerial work regime. As a consequence, following childbirth, many female managers switch to occupations that underutilise their skills.

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  • Geraint Johnes, 2009. "Occupation and the labour market participation of women: why do some people trade down jobs when careers are interrupted?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(11), pages 1093-1096.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:16:y:2009:i:11:p:1093-1096
    DOI: 10.1080/13504850701367155
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Donghoon Lee, 2005. "An Estimable Dynamic General Equilibrium Model Of Work, Schooling, And Occupational Choice," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(1), pages 1-34, February.
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    5. Anyadike-Danes, Michael & McVicar, Duncan, 2005. "You'll never walk alone: Childhood influences and male career path clusters," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 511-530, August.
    6. Keane, Michael P & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1997. "The Career Decisions of Young Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(3), pages 473-522, June.
    7. Stinebrickner, Todd R, 2001. "Compensation Policies and Teacher Decisions," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 42(3), pages 751-779, August.
    8. Zvi Eckstein & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 1999. "Why Youths Drop Out of High School: The Impact of Preferences, Opportunities, and Abilities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(6), pages 1295-1340, November.
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