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Winners and losers in Vietnam equitisation programs

Author

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  • Le, Hoang Cuong
  • Cabalu, Helen
  • Salim, Ruhul

Abstract

This article develops a computable general equilibrium model of Vietnam to assess the long-run likely effects of the country's equitisation programs on its national economic outcomes and industries. Equitisation is found to be pro-growth as reflected in its contribution to increasing real GDP growth rate in the long run. In terms of industrial output growth rates, the winners include electrical, steel and other manufacturing, while the losers include rice and paddy, and oil, gas and petroleum. To achieve better economic outcomes, the coverage of equitisation should be extended to include medium to large state-owned enterprises across all industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Le, Hoang Cuong & Cabalu, Helen & Salim, Ruhul, 2014. "Winners and losers in Vietnam equitisation programs," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 172-184.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:36:y:2014:i:1:p:172-184
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jpolmod.2013.10.012
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    1. repec:eee:ecanpo:v:54:y:2017:i:c:p:15-25 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Doi Moi; Privatisation; Equitisation; State-owned enterprises; Computable general equilibrium;

    JEL classification:

    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • P22 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Prices

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