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Understanding changes in exchange rate pass-through

  • Takhtamanova, Yelena F.

Recent research suggests that there has been a decline in the extent to which firms "pass-through" changes in exchange rates to prices. This paper provides further evidence in support of this claim. Additionally, it proposes an explanation for this phenomenon. The paper then presents empirical evidence of a structural break during the 1990s in the relationship between the real exchange rate and CPI inflation for a set of fourteen OECD countries. It is suggested that the recent reduction in the real exchange rate pass-through can in part be attributed to the low inflationary environment of the 1990s.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Macroeconomics.

Volume (Year): 32 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 1118-1130

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:32:y:2010:i:4:p:1118-1130
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622617

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