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Balance sheet effects on monetary and financial spillovers: The East Asian crisis plus 20

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  • Aizenman, Joshua
  • Chinn, Menzie D.
  • Ito, Hiro

Abstract

We study how the financial conditions in the Center Economies [the U.S., Japan, and the Euro area] impact other countries over the period 1986 through 2015. Our methodology relies upon a two-step approach. We focus on five possible linkages between the center economies (CEs) and the non-Center economics, or peripheral economies (PHs), and investigate the strength of these linkages. For each of the five linkages, we first regress a financial variable of the PHs on financial variables of the CEs while controlling for global factors. Next, we examine the determinants of sensitivity to the CEs as a function of country-specific macroeconomic conditions and policies, including the exchange rate regime, currency weights, monetary, trade and financial linkages with the CEs, the levels of institutional development, and international reserves. Extending our previous work (Aizenman et al., 2016), we devote special attention to the impact of currency weights in the implicit currency basket, balance sheet exposure, and currency composition of external debt. We find that for both policy interest rates and the real exchange rate (REER), the link with the CEs has been pervasive for developing and emerging market economies in the last two decades, although the movements of policy interest rates are found to be more sensitive to global financial shocks around the time of the emerging markets’ crises in the late 1990s and early 2000s, and since 2008. When we estimate the determinants of the extent of connectivity, we find evidence that the weights of major currencies, external debt, and currency compositions of debt are significant factors. More specifically, having a higher weight on the dollar (or the euro) makes the response of a financial variable such as the REER and exchange market pressure in the PHs more sensitive to a change in key variables in the U.S. (or the euro area) such as policy interest rates and the REER. While having more exposure to external debt would have similar impacts on the financial linkages between the CEs and the PHs, the currency composition of international debt securities does matter. Economies more reliant on dollar-denominated debt issuance tend to be more vulnerable to shocks emanating from the U.S.

Suggested Citation

  • Aizenman, Joshua & Chinn, Menzie D. & Ito, Hiro, 2017. "Balance sheet effects on monetary and financial spillovers: The East Asian crisis plus 20," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 258-282.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jimfin:v:74:y:2017:i:c:p:258-282
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jimonfin.2017.02.020
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ahmed, Shaghil & Coulibaly, Brahima & Zlate, Andrei, 2015. "International Financial Spillovers to Emerging Market Economies: How Important Are Economic Fundamentals?," International Finance Discussion Papers 1135, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Shin-ichi Fukuda & Mariko Tanaka, 2017. "The Impacts of Emerging Asia on Global Financial Markets," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(12), pages 2725-2743, December.
    3. Joshua Aizenman & Menzie D. Chinn & Hiro Ito, 2017. "Financial Spillovers and Macroprudential Policies," NBER Working Papers 24105, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Shin-ichi Fukuda & Mariko Tanaka, 2017. "The Impacts of Emerging Asia on Global Financial Markets," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1050, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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