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The long-term health impacts of Medicaid and CHIP

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  • Thompson, Owen

Abstract

This paper estimates the effect of US public health insurance programs for children on health. Previous work in this area has typically focused on the relationship between current program eligibility and current health. But because health is a stock variable which reflects the cumulative influence of health inputs, it would be preferable to estimate the impact of total program eligibility during childhood on longer-term health outcomes. I provide such estimates by using longitudinal data to construct Medicaid and CHIP eligibility measures that are observed from birth through age 18 and estimating the effect of cumulative program exposure on a variety of health outcomes observed in early adulthood. To account for the endogeneity of program eligibility, I exploit variation in Medicaid and CHIP generosity across states and over time for children of different ages. I find that an additional year of public health insurance eligibility during childhood improves a summary index of adult health by.079 standard deviations, and substantially reduces health limitations, chronic conditions and asthma prevalence while improving self-rated health.

Suggested Citation

  • Thompson, Owen, 2017. "The long-term health impacts of Medicaid and CHIP," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 26-40.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:51:y:2017:i:c:p:26-40
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2016.12.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Chloe N. East & Sarah Miller & Marianne Page & Laura R. Wherry, 2017. "Multi-generational Impacts of Childhood Access to the Safety Net: Early Life Exposure to Medicaid and the Next Generation’s Health," NBER Working Papers 23810, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Sarah Miller & Sean Altekruse & Norman Johnson & Laura R. Wherry, 2019. "Medicaid and Mortality: New Evidence from Linked Survey and Administrative Data," NBER Working Papers 26081, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Lu, Shengfeng & Chen, Sixia & Wang, Peigang, 2019. "Language barriers and health status of elderly migrants: Micro-evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 94-112.

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    Keywords

    Medicaid; Child health;

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