IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/wly/jpamgt/v24y2005i3p499-522.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The devil may be in the details: How the characteristics of SCHIP programs affect take-up

Author

Listed:
  • Barbara Wolfe

    (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

  • Scott Scrivner

    (Public|Private Ventures)

Abstract

In this paper, we explore whether the specific design of a state's program has contributed to its success in meeting two objectives of the Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP): increasing the health insurance coverage of children in lowerincome families and doing so with a minimum reduction in their private health insurance coverage (crowd-out). In our analysis, we use two years of Current Population Survey data, 2000 and 2001, matched with detailed data on state programs. We focus on two populations: the eligible population of children, broadly defined-those living in families with incomes below 300 percent of the federal poverty line (FPL)-and a narrower group of children, those who we estimate are eligible for Medicaid or SCHIP. Unique state program characteristics in the analysis include whether the state plan covers families; whether the state uses presumptive eligibility; the number of months without private coverage that are required for eligibility; whether there is an asset test; whether a face-to-face interview is required; and specific outreach activities. Our results provide evidence that state program characteristics are significant determinants of program success. © 2005 by the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management

Suggested Citation

  • Barbara Wolfe & Scott Scrivner, 2005. "The devil may be in the details: How the characteristics of SCHIP programs affect take-up," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(3), pages 499-522.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:24:y:2005:i:3:p:499-522
    DOI: 10.1002/pam.20112
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/pam.20112
    File Function: Link to full text; subscription required
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. James Marton & Angela Snyder & Mei Zhou, 2016. "Enhanced Citizenship Verification And Children'S Medicaid Coverage," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(3), pages 1670-1683, July.
    2. Mahmud, Mir, 2016. "Immigrant Children’s Access to Public Health Insurance after CHIPRA-2009," MPRA Paper 80602, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. James Marton & Aaron Yelowitz, 2015. "Health insurance generosity and conditional coverage: Evidence from medicaid managed care in Kentucky," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 535-555, October.
    4. Slack, Kristen Shook & Holl, Jane L. & Yoo, Joan & Amsden, Laura B. & Collins, Emily & Bolger, Kerry, 2007. "Welfare, work, and health care access predictors of low-income children's physical health outcomes," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 782-801, June.
    5. David Zimmer, 2011. "The Effects of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program on Insurance Status and Health Care Utilization of Children," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 373-383, June.
    6. Thompson, Owen, 2017. "The long-term health impacts of Medicaid and CHIP," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 26-40.
    7. Sheila Hoag & Sean Orzol & Margaret Colby & Adam Swinburn & Fredric Blavin & Genevieve M. Kenney & Michael Huntress, 2012. "CHIPRA Mandated Evaluation of Express Lane Eligibility First Year Findings," Mathematica Policy Research Reports ea8d230cec104e90ad417b32a, Mathematica Policy Research.
    8. Wolfe, Barbara & Kaplan, Thomas & Haveman, Robert & Cho, Yoonyoung, 2006. "SCHIP expansion and parental coverage: An evaluation of Wisconsin's BadgerCare," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 1170-1192, November.
    9. Sean Orzol & Linda Barterian & Michael Barna, 2012. "Proven Strategies in Health Care Coverage Program Outreach and Enrollment," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 2f2980ef67654808b495e7782, Mathematica Policy Research.
    10. repec:mpr:mprres:7819 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:mpr:mprres:7810 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. James Marton & Patricia G. Ketsche & Mei Zhou, 2010. "SCHIP premiums, enrollment, and expenditures: a two state, competing risk analysis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(7), pages 772-791.
    13. Buchmueller Thomas C & Lo Sasso Anthony T & Wong Kathleen N, 2008. "How Did SCHIP Affect the Insurance Coverage of Immigrant Children?," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 8(2), pages 1-25, January.
    14. Thomas Buchmueller & John C. Ham & Lara D. Shore-Sheppard, 2015. "The Medicaid Program," NBER Chapters,in: Economics of Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, volume 1, pages 21-136 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Cynthia Bansak & Steven Raphael, 2007. "The effects of state policy design features on take-up and crowd-out rates for the state children's health insurance program," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(1), pages 149-175.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:24:y:2005:i:3:p:499-522. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/34787/home .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.