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Optimal recall length in survey design

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  • Clarke, Philip M.
  • Fiebig, Denzil G.
  • Gerdtham, Ulf-G.

Abstract

Self-reported data collected via surveys are a key input into a wide range of research conducted by economists. It is well known that such data are subject to measurement error that arises when respondents are asked to recall past utilisation. Survey designers must determine the length of the recall period and face a trade-off as increasing the recall period provides more information, but increases the likelihood of recall error. A statistical framework is used to explore this trade-off. Finally we illustrate how optimal recall periods can be estimated using hospital use data from Sweden's Survey of Living Conditions.

Suggested Citation

  • Clarke, Philip M. & Fiebig, Denzil G. & Gerdtham, Ulf-G., 2008. "Optimal recall length in survey design," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1275-1284, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:27:y:2008:i:5:p:1275-1284
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    5. Thomas F. Crossley & Joachim K. Winter, 2014. "Asking Households about Expenditures: What Have We Learned?," NBER Chapters, in: Improving the Measurement of Consumer Expenditures, pages 23-50, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Kjellsson, Gustav & Clarke, Philip & Gerdtham, Ulf-G., 2014. "Forgetting to remember or remembering to forget: A study of the recall period length in health care survey questions," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 34-46.
    7. Emer Fogarty & Cathal Walsh & Christopher McGuigan & Niall Tubridy & Michael Barry, 2014. "Direct and Indirect Economic Consequences of Multiple Sclerosis in Ireland," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 12(6), pages 635-645, December.
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    9. Lu, Chunling & Liu, Kai & Li, Lingling & Yang, Yuhong, 2017. "Sensitivity of measuring the progress in financial risk protection to survey design and its socioeconomic and demographic determinants: A case study in Rwanda," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 11-18.
    10. José Cuesta & Camilo Bohórquez, 2011. "Estimating recall bias without gold standards: job tenure in Colombia," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(8), pages 703-709.
    11. Kim Dalziel & Jinhu Li & Anthony Scott & Philip Clarke, 2018. "Accuracy of patient recall for self‐reported doctor visits: Is shorter recall better?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(11), pages 1684-1698, November.
    12. Rochelle Belkar & Waranya Pim Chanthapun & Denzil G. Fiebig, 2007. "A discrete choice model with misclassification and multiple recall periods," Discussion Papers 2007-10, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    13. Marcin Hitczenko, 2013. "Optimal recall period length in consumer payment surveys," Working Papers 13-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    14. Kirstine Hansen & Dylan Kneale, 2013. "Does How You Measure Income Make a Difference to Measuring Poverty? Evidence from the UK," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 110(3), pages 1119-1140, February.
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    16. Van Vliet, Olaf & Been, Jim & Caminada, Koen & Goudswaard, Kees, 2011. "Pension reform and income inequality among the elderly in 15 European countries," MPRA Paper 32940, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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