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Economic benefits from promoting linseed in the diet of dairy cows for reducing methane emissions and improving milk quality

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  • Marette, Stéphan
  • Millet, Guy

Abstract

Linseed for feeding dairy cows reduces methane emissions and increases the omega-3 content of milk. In a lab experiment, milk bottles from cows fed a diet with or without linseed were offered to French participants for eliciting their willingness to pay (WTP). Successive messages highlighting the different effects of linseed were revealed to participants. We find that messages including the ones on methane emissions and omega-3 in milk significantly impact the participants’ WTP. These WTP estimates are used for welfare simulations that underline the positive impact of a public advertising campaign informing about linseed. When informing participants via a campaign becomes difficult, some regulatory tools like a quality standard may complement this advertising campaign.

Suggested Citation

  • Marette, Stéphan & Millet, Guy, 2014. "Economic benefits from promoting linseed in the diet of dairy cows for reducing methane emissions and improving milk quality," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 140-149.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:46:y:2014:i:c:p:140-149
    DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2014.03.010
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    1. Jutta Roosen & Stéphan Marette, 2011. "Making the "right" choice based on experiments: regulatory decisions for food and health," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 38(3), pages 361-381, August.
    2. Disdier, Anne-Célia & Marette, Stéphan & Millet, Guy, 2013. "Are consumers concerned about palm oil? Evidence from a lab experiment," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 180-189.
    3. Marette Stéphan & Roosen Jutta & Blanchemanche Sandrine, 2011. "The Combination of Lab and Field Experiments for Benefit-Cost Analysis," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, De Gruyter, vol. 2(3), pages 1-36, August.
    4. Anne-Célia Disdier & Stéphan Marette, 2012. "Taxes, minimum-quality standards and/or product labeling to improve environmental quality and welfare: Experiments can provide answers," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 337-357, June.
    5. Joseph E. Aldy & Alan J. Krupnick & Richard G. Newell & Ian W. H. Parry & William A. Pizer, 2010. "Designing Climate Mitigation Policy," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 48(4), pages 903-934, December.
    6. Lusk, Jayson L. & Pruitt, J.R. & Norwood, Bailey, 2006. "External validity of a framed field experiment," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 93(2), pages 285-290, November.
    7. Jayson L. Lusk & Stéphan Marette, 2010. "Welfare Effects of Food Labels and Bans with Alternative Willingness to Pay Measures," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 32(2), pages 319-337.
    8. Stéphan Marette & Jutta Roosen & Sandrine Blanchemanche, 2008. "Taxes and subsidies to change eating habits when information is not enough: an application to fish consumption," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 119-143, October.
    9. Lusk, Jayson L. & House, Lisa O. & Valli, Carlotta & Jaeger, Sara R. & Moore, Melissa & Morrow, Bert & Traill, W. Bruce, 2005. "Consumer welfare effects of introducing and labeling genetically modified food," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 88(3), pages 382-388, September.
    10. Wansink, Brian & Sonka, Steven T. & Hasler, Clare M., 2004. "Front-label health claims: when less is more," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 659-667, December.
    11. Marette, Stéphan & Messéan, Antoine & Millet, Guy, 2012. "Consumers’ willingness to pay for eco-friendly apples under different labels: Evidences from a lab experiment," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 151-161.
    12. Stéphan Marette, 2010. "Consumer confusion and multiple equilibria," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(2), pages 1120-1128.
    13. Matthew Rousu & Wallace E. Huffman & Jason F. Shogren & Abebayehu Tegene, 2007. "Effects And Value Of Verifiable Information In A Controversial Market: Evidence From Lab Auctions Of Genetically Modified Food," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(3), pages 409-432, July.
    14. Hasson, Reviva & Löfgren, Åsa & Visser, Martine, 2010. "Climate change in a public goods game: Investment decision in mitigation versus adaptation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 331-338, December.
    15. Stéphan Marette, 2013. "The Strategy of One Firm Offering a New Product with Willingness to Pay Elicited in the Lab," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(3), pages 361-376, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ignacio Pérez Domínguez & Thomas Fellmann & Franz Weiss & Peter Witzke & Jesús Barreiro-Hurlé & Mihaly Himics & Torbjörn Jansson & Guna Salputra & Adrian Leip, 2016. "An economic assessment of GHG mitigation policy options for EU agriculture (EcAMPA 2)," JRC Working Papers JRC101396, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    2. Marette, Stéphan & Martin, Christophe & Bouillot, Fabienne, 2017. "Two experiments in one: How accounting for context matters for welfare estimates," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 12-24.
    3. Marette, Stephan, 2017. "Quality, market mechanisms and regulation in the food chain," Bio-based and Applied Economics Journal, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA), vol. 5(3), February.
    4. Staudigel, Matthias & Anders, Sven, 2016. "Does Taste Trump Health? – The Effect Of Nutrient Profiles On Brand-Level Demand For Chips In The U.S," 56th Annual Conference, Bonn, Germany, September 28-30, 2016 244760, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
    5. Caroline Orset & Nicolas Barret & Aurélien Lemaire, 2017. "How consumers of plastic water bottles are responding to environmental policies?," Post-Print hal-01500900, HAL.
    6. Ignacio Perez Dominguez & Thomas Fellmann & Peter Witzke & Franz Weiss & Jordan Hristov & Mihaly Himics & Jesus Barreiro-Hurle & Manuel Gomez Barbero & Adrian Leip, 2020. "Economic assessment of GHG mitigation policy options for EU agriculture: A closer look at mitigation options and regional mitigation costs (EcAMPA 3)," JRC Working Papers JRC120355, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    7. Staudigel, Matthias & Anders, Sven, 2016. "Does taste trump health? Effects of nutritional characteristics on brand-level demand for chips in the U.S," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 235755, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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    Keywords

    Experiment; Quality; Milk; Regulation;

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