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African aquaculture: Realizing the potential

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  • Brummett, Randall E.
  • Lazard, Jérôme
  • Moehl, John

Abstract

Despite 40 years of research and development, and hundreds of millions of dollars spent, aquaculture is struggling to realize its high biophysical potential in Africa. Hampered by ineffective institutional arrangements and donor-driven projects, the substantial gains in desperately needed food security and economic growth predicted by development agencies have generally not been achieved. Nevertheless, African aquaculture has demonstrated its competitiveness, producing fishes that feed low on the food chain in a range of well-adapted, environmentally friendly and profitable farming systems that meet the needs of a broad spectrum of user-groups. Key constraints to broader growth include lack of good quality seed, feed and technical advice; poor market infrastructure and access; and weak policies that, rather than accelerate, impede expansion, largely by emphasizing central planning over private sector initiative. If African aquaculture is to make substantial and much needed contributions to the continent's development, government policy should attempt to facilitate the alleviation of key constraints and rely more heavily on commercial investments to lead future growth. Evidence to date indicates that a pragmatic business approach focusing on small and medium-scale private enterprises would produce more benefits for more people than centrally planned and government led development projects.

Suggested Citation

  • Brummett, Randall E. & Lazard, Jérôme & Moehl, John, 2008. "African aquaculture: Realizing the potential," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 371-385, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:33:y:2008:i:5:p:371-385
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Delgado, Christopher L. & Hopkins, Jane & Kelly , Valerie & Hazell, P. B. R. & McKenna, Anna A. & Gruhn, Peter & Hojjati, Behjat & Sil, Jayashree & Courbois, Claude, 1998. "Agricultural growth linkages in Sub-Saharan Africa:," Research reports 107, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Brummett, Randall E. & Noble, R., 1995. "Aquaculture for African smallholders," Technical Reports 44729, Worldfish Center.
    3. Brummett, R.E. & Noble, R., 1995. "Aquaculture for African smallholders," Working Papers, The WorldFish Center, number 9978, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Allison, E.H., 2011. "Aquaculture, fisheries, poverty and food security," Working Papers, The WorldFish Center, number 39575, September.
    2. Brummett, Randall E. & Gockowski, James & Pouomogne, Victor & Muir, James, 2011. "Targeting agricultural research and extension for food security and poverty alleviation: A case study of fish farming in Central Cameroon," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 805-814.
    3. Jessica Blythe, 2013. "Social-ecological analysis of integrated agriculture-aquaculture systems in Dedza, Malawi," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 1143-1155, August.
    4. Wisdom Akpalu & Worku T. Bitew, 2017. "Externalities and foreign capital in aquaculture production in developing countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 001, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Balgah Roland Azibo & Emmanuel Yenshu Vubo & Innocent Ndoh Mbue & Jude Ndzifon Kimengsi, 2015. "Rural development NGOs and service delivery to the very poor: An empirical analysis of a training center in rural Cameroon," Asian Journal of Agriculture and rural Development, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(4), pages 103-115, April.
    6. Randall Brummett, 2011. "Growing Fish to Make Money in Africa," World Bank Other Operational Studies 10427, The World Bank.
    7. Toufique, Kazi Ali & Belton, Ben, 2014. "Is Aquaculture Pro-Poor? Empirical Evidence of Impacts on Fish Consumption in Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 609-620.

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