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Loss-induced emotions and criminal behavior: An experimental analysis

Author

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  • Baumann, Florian
  • Benndorf, Volker
  • Friese, Maria

Abstract

We analyze the influence of frustration and anger on committing a norm violation in a laboratory experiment. Subjects complete a real-effort task where compensation is framed as a gain or a loss and subsequently report experienced levels of different emotions. Finally, subjects may increase their own income by taking away money designated for donation to charity. While both males and females experience higher levels of negative emotions in the loss frame than in the gain frame, we find that only men are more likely to take away money in the loss scenario.

Suggested Citation

  • Baumann, Florian & Benndorf, Volker & Friese, Maria, 2019. "Loss-induced emotions and criminal behavior: An experimental analysis," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 134-145.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:159:y:2019:i:c:p:134-145
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2019.01.020
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Crime; Experiment; Norm violation;

    JEL classification:

    • K14 - Law and Economics - - Basic Areas of Law - - - Criminal Law
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior

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